Jacob and Margaret Snider

Back Creek
Berkeley County (WV) Virginia


Snake Spring Valley
Bedford County, Pennsylvania





Compiled by:

Thomas Stephen Neel
169 East Main Street
New London OH 44851

419-929-3441

tomneel@frontier.com

2007


Preface

This booklet was prepared in response to the news that a marker honoring the grave site of Jacob Snider Sr (1732-1790) was to be erected on Back Creek in Berkeley Co WV on Saturday, October 6, 2007 at 11:00 AM. Unfortunately, I am involved with a seminar in Ohio that day and will not be able to attend. Perhaps I will be able to come to a similar ceremony at the Snider Reunion in 2008 to honor the burial spot of Jacob’s wife, Margaret Snider, in Snake Spring Valley, Bedford Co PA.
In reviewing my Snider research files, I find that most of my notes date from the early 1980s. I am ashamed to say that I have hardly touched this line in some 20-25 years. I am therefore out of the loop, so to speak, and have not made contact with the many new descendants of Jacob Snider brought together through the World Wide Web and, lately, the Snider DNA study.
My purpose in putting out this preliminary tract is therefore to learn what I have missed in twenty years. Perhaps someone has discovered the family Bible, or has done work on some of the children for which I am lacking information, or perhaps has disproved some item that I have taken as fact. I am only interested in Jacob and Margaret Snider and their immediate children, my uncles and aunts. The work on compiling data on grandchildren to the umpteenth generation has been taken on by Robert Longbottom of Suffield, OH, and by those who are involved with the many Snider reunions and Internet sites.
My own ancestor is Elizabeth (Snider) Henricks, a daughter of Jacob Snider, who married John Henricks. They left Bedford Co PA about 1807, and Henricks constructed a mill in what is now Mount Perry, Madison Twp., Perry Co OH. Like most Snider descendants, the German Baptist faith touched these families. Living in Ohio in the middle of Amish country, each day on the way to work, I am reminded of the old family photographs of the Henricks women dressed in their bonnets. My mother’s family, in fact, spoke German well past the Civil War era – some 150 years after immigration. The meat and potatoes heritage must have been strong!
Please feel free to share this work with others. My plan is to post this on my web site rather than to be bothered with copy requests.
Note: I intended to place a PDF file on my web site, but with the imbedded photographs, I soon found out that the 8 MB file was well beyond the restrictions of my free website host, GeoCities. So, this is just text in HTML with the photos removed. I would be glad to email the PDF file to anyone who wants to print out the 66-page booklet as it should appear. Keep in mind that the new MicroSoft Outlook on new Vista computers will block receipt of any files over 1 MB, so this is offer will be good only for those who have other browsers. My email is tomneel@verizon.net

http://www.geocities.com/titosp

Thank you.

Tom Neel, September 2007

Jacob and Margaret Snider Family of Berkeley Co., West Virginia

Jacob Snider of Berkeley Co VA made his will 28 Nov 1787 (Berkeley Co Loose Papers – LDS Roll 1845196). His “beloved wife Margret Snider” was to have the home plantation until “my younger son William” came of age. If she remarried, Jacob’s “three sons, David, Joseph and Abraham” were to have said plantation until William reached maturity. “Two sons, John and Jacob Snyder [sic]” were to receive a tract of land in Bedford Co PA purchased of Kennedy, paying any value over their equal share in the estate to the other children. “My two sons David and Joseph Snider” were given, under the same arrangement, 205 acres in Pennsylvania purchased of Jacob Studeybacker [sic]. “My son Aberham [sic] Snider” was to have the Berkeley Co VA tract purchased of Alexander Wheat and Alexander Catlick’s obligation to make me a title for it. “My three younger sons, Daniel, George & William” were to be well educated and were to live on the plantation until of age. “If my wife shold [sic] marry she is not to tack [sic] any of the children with her.” When William Snider arrived at age, the plantation was to be sold by the executors and Margaret was to receive one-third if she remained a widow. “All my surviving children shall have a equal shear [sic] of my estate in Virginia and Pennsylvania.” “My two sons David and Aberham Snider” were appointed executors. The paper is split at the signature but appears to have been signed by Jacob Snider. There were three witnesses, Jacob Siler, Jacob Stuckey, and Thos. Sharp. The executors brought the will into court 15 Jun 1790, indicating that their father had died prior to that date.
The will, by itself, proves that Jacob Snider had older sons - David, Joseph, Abraham, John, Jacob; and younger sons – Daniel, George, and William – probably minors in 1787. There was a wife, Margaret, but it is possible that she was not the mother of any of the children since she was not permitted to take them if she remarried. No daughters were mentioned or implied in the will, although Jacob Snider said “I alow everey chilld to have a equall share in my estat [sic].” A final account with David and Abraham Snyder [sic], executors, filed in Berkeley Co VA on 24 Feb 1806, lists several large payments at the top [in pounds, shillings, pence]:


  • To cash paid William Snyder.......32.0.0
  • To d.o. pd. John Overholser.........22.8.0
  • To d.o. pd. Simon Stookey...........31.19.6
  • To d.o. pd. Jacob Studebaker......23.5.6 ½
  • To d.o. pd. James Mortimer.........[blank]
  • To d.o. pd. John Hendricks.........32.00.6
  • To d.o. pd. George Snyder..........32.00.6
  • To d.o. pd. Daniel Snyder............32.04.0


  • This is followed by several smaller bills, all under two pounds, except for:

  • To d.o. pd. Jacob Ryner,,,,,,,,,,.,...9.11.9 ½
  • To 4 pr. Cent on the amt. of L862.0.9 allowed the executors for their trouble.....34.9.7.

  • Distributions totaled 256.16.5 in this final record. It is quite clear that these are the payments to the heirs who did not receive land – the younger sons, William, George, and Daniel – and daughters married to John Overholser, Simon Stookey, Jacob Studebaker, and John Hendricks. James Mortimer and Jacob Ryner could be additional sons-in-law, but it doesn’t quite appear to be proven by this record.
    However, there is an earlier account in the file, dated 3 May 1793 by John Cooke, John Kerney, and David Hunter. Among the payments allowed by the executors from a total of L290.10.7 in this rendering:

  • 1791 & 1792
  • Credit to the above
  • By the widow’s dowrey [sic].......................................75.10.2
  • By Joseph Snyder, a legatee.....................................10.14.0
  • By Hannah Snyder & Jacob Rynerd, d.o.................15.8.0
  • By Margret Snyder, a legatee.....................................3.10.0
  • [different penmanship probably added closer to the filing date]
  • By cash to David Snider as by proven amount......32.0.0
  • By cash paid Joseph Snider as pd. d.o..................20.0.0
  • By cash paid Abraham Snider..................................20.0.0
  • By the executors for their trouble..............................14.18.6

  • From this accounting, Hannah Snider, who is believed to have married Jacob Riner, is a legatee or daughter of the deceased. It is not clear whether the second Margaret is a daughter or the widow.
    An accounting exhibited to the court on 25 Sep 1805 by Chas. Orrick, John Turner, and Stephen Snodgrass, further identifies the land of Jacob Snider:

  • By Jacob Snyders land in Virginia, 514 acres, sold to Abraham Snyder at $4 pr acre - $616
  • By 111 acres and 64 poles on Tusses [sic] Run, Pennsylvania, valued at $3 pr acre $334.10 - $100
  • By 195 acres, 3 roods, and 24 poles of land in Pennsylvania at 18/6 Penn. C[urrency] pr acre, ten acres of which is now in dispute, and not decided in law - $145

  • Also of interest is the inventory of Jacob Snider’s personal effects, made 10 Aug 1790 by Elon Miller, William Frazer, and Henry Ranner, appraisers, and brought into court 21 Sep 1790 [in pounds, shilling, pence].

  • His wearing apearel 48 S, one mare and colt 50 S...............................................4.18.0
  • One colt 100 S, one bay horse 160 S, one black gelding 200 S..........,...............23.0.0
  • One black gelding 200 S, one Dito 120 S, one mare 200.......................,.............26.0.0
  • One colt 30 S, one cow 60 S, one Dito 40 S, one Dito 50 S....................,,...........11.10.0
  • One white cow 60 S, one Dito 60 S, one Dito 50 S....................................,,,.........8.10.0
  • One cow 55 S, one Dito 60 S, one Dito 45 S...............................................,,,.........8.0.0
  • One cow & bell 65 S, one Dito 60 S, one Dito 65 S...................................,,,.........9.10.0
  • One bull 50 S, one stear 50 S, two stears 75 S...........................................,,.........8.15.0
  • Two stears and one bell 55 S & two heifers 60 S.......................................,,,.......5.15.0
  • Eight young cattle 96 S & four calfs 16 S & 26 sheep 156 S.....................,,......16.8.0
  • Waggon and gears & cloth and jack screw..................................................,,,,....19.10.0
  • One wagon and lock chain 60 S, one ploug & single trees 20 S.............,,.......4.5.0
  • One set of harrow teeth 25 S, one cros cut saw 16 S..................................,,.....2.1.0
  • Five barrels of flower 100 S, one plough and irons 30 S............................,,,.....6.10.0
  • One plough 10 S, one wind mill 30 S, plough harness & chain 19 S......,.......12.12.0
  • One cutting box & knife 12 S, the crop of wheat and rye............................,,,,,,...23.4.0
  • Wooden lumber 12 S, Dito wooden vessels 13 S 6 D............................,,.........1.5.6
  • Crockery ware 2 S 10 D, wooden vessels 3 S 3 D...................................,,.........0.6.6
  • Loom and tacklings 30 S, old iron 6 S, 3 axes 12 S......................................,.....5.8.0
  • Carpenter tools 16 S, 3 sythes 3 S 9 D, 4 pots & 2 frying pans 30 S 6 D,,......2.10.3
  • One dresser and pewter tin vessels & iron ladles 32 S...........................,........1.12.0
  • One table knives and forks 2 S, 3 water buckets 2 S 6 D.........................,,.......0.4.6
  • Eleven chairs 12 S & 2 spinning wheels & clock reel 9 S.........................,,......1.1.0
  • One cubbord 15 S, bed and bedsted 25 S, one Dito 25 S.........................,,.....3.5.0
  • Two beds and furnature 36 S, one hogshead 6 S......................................,,......2.2.0
  • 3 chests 12 S, 11 bushels of salt 24 S 9 D, 2 stone jugs 4 S...........................2.0.9
  • To linning cloth..............................................................................................,,,,,,......0.4.7
  • 25 hoggs.....................................................................................................,,,,,...........9.13.0
  • 12 flower barrels 10 S & one hogshead 2/6..........................................,,............0.12.6
  • Walnut plank 15 S, pine plank 16 S..........................................................,,,.........1.11.0
  • Pine & poplar plank......................................................................................,,,,.......1.14.6
  • Brass kettle 12 S, 2 saddles 18 S.............................................................,,.........1.10.2
  • 7 books 24 S, one table 3 S........................................................................,,.........1.7.0
  • Smith tools.....................................................................................................,,,,.......4.10.0
  • Total - $223.11.1


  • This tells us that Jacob Snider and his sons raised wheat and rye on their plantation, were involved in carpentry, and had some blacksmith tools. They raised cattle and had a small number of horses. The number of chairs, eleven, would suggest a large family. (Hopefully one of those seven books someday is found to be a family Bible.)
    Portions of the Jacob Snider estate records are also recorded in the Berkeley Co WV courthouse ledgers. The will appears in Will Book 2, p. 68. The inventory is in Will Book 2, p. 73. The final distribution is in Will Book 4, p. 54.
    We have started with the demise of our patron, Jacob Snider, but estate papers often are the document that binds a family together genealogically. Snider’s tombstone also survives on his Back Creek plantation near what is called the Swinging Bridge. Badly worn, it is believed to read – MH 3 – 1790 – JS 58 – indicating that Jacob Snider died 3 Mar 1790 aged 58 years. Donald Riggs (1980) stated “there were more graves there but they had been trodden down by farm animals over the years [Find-a-Grave submission 8 Feb 2002 by Robert Longbottom].” A new marker was added in October 2007. It should be noted that researcher Ernest L. Snider believes this is a land survey marker, but it looks like a primitive tombstone to me.
    Land records are a second source most often used by genealogists and several deeds are on file for our Jacob Snider that tie into the references to Virginia and Pennsylvania tracts mentioned in the estate papers. It should be noted that there are other deeds for Jacob Snider in both counties, but they cannot be attributed to our ancestor. It is a common name.

    Frederick Co VA Indenture, 2 Jan 1770, Robert Jackson and Catharine, his wife, of the county of Frederick, Colony of Virginia, to Jacob Snider, in consideration of 5 shillings, a tract on both sides of Back Creek, the same patented 4 Sep 1766 by Jackson, beginning at two corner pines at the foot of the North Mountain, thence N 50 degrees W 146 poles to a corner gum, thence S 40 degrees W 232 poles to a corner white oak in Hugh Miller’s line, thence along it S 30 degrees E 202 poles to his corner ash on the NW side of Back Creek, along North Mountain N 32 degrees E 305 poles to the beginning, containing 276 acres. Signed Robert Jackson (but not by wife). Witnesses, E. Denison, John Nevill, Jonathan Leaman. Recorded 3 Mar 1771 [Book 14, p. 149-151; Buck p. 154 interprets witnesses as Robinson and Seaman].
    Northern Neck Grants, Berkeley Co VA, Vol. P, 1771-1775, p. 190-191, Reel 296 [The Library of Virginia – online]. Thomas Lord Fairfax of Scotland, Great Britain, the Proprietor, to Jacob Snider of Berkeley Co VA, for compensation and annual rent, a tract on both sides of Back Creek, by a survey made by Richard Rigg, beginning at a pine and white oak, corner to Robert Elder’s 296-acre tract, along a line thereof reversed S 60 degrees W 102 poles to a red oak in the line on the north side of Brushy Ridge, then N 57 degrees W 66 poles to a black oak and white oak on the south side of the Big Ridge, then along the said side N 30 degrees E 64 poles to a black oak, a white oak, and a hickory on the south side of said ridge, then down it N 77 degrees E 74 poles to a pine on the west side of a path in or near the line of James Patterson’s 100-acre tract, then along his line S 72 degrees E 42 poles to the tract’s corner white oak on the east side of a drain, then 40 poles to a twisted pine on the south on the south side of a very brushy hill, then N 40 degrees E 74 poles to a black oak on the side of a ridge, then N 50 degrees W 18 poles to two black oaks on the side of a brushy ridge, then N 40 degrees E 60 poles and extending along Back Creek 24 poles to two ashes and a dogwood sapling on broken bottom ground, then S 52 degrees E 184 poles to three chestnut oaks on the brakes of the west side of North Mountain, then S 20 degrees W 236 poles to two chestnut oaks on a high hill, then N 32 degrees W 42 poles to a Spanish oak and an ash on the east bank of Back Creek, then along Robert Jackson’s line N 32 degrees E 272 poles to two pines corner to said mountain foot, then N 40 degrees W 146 poles to a corner gum, then S 40 degrees W 232 poles to a corner white oak in Robert Elder’s line, and then along it N 30 degrees W 35 poles to the beginning, containing 140 acres. The rent one shilling sterling per every 50 acres, payable on the feast day of St. Michael the Archangel. Signed in Frederick Co VA by Lord Fairfax. Dated 17 Feb 1773.
    Northern Neck Grants, Vol. U, p. 534-535 (Reel 300), Berkeley Co VA [Library of Virginia – online]. Beverley Randolph, Esq., Governor of Virginia, to William Fairis, 23 acres on the drains of Back Creek, being part of a 93 ½ acre survey made for Jacob Snider on 23 Apr 1779, beginning at a pine on a pine hill corner to Snider, thence along his line N 12 degrees E 79 poles to two pines and the beginning corner to his 40 acres, thence with the line N 14 degrees E 30 poles to a white oak in the line corner to Robert Snodgrass, thence along his line N 54 degrees W 36 poles to two black oaks and a walnut on the top of a ridge at Daniel Kennedy’s corner, to his part of the entire survey, thence along his line reversed S 30 degrees W 74 poles to two black oaks on the top of the ridge Kennedy’s corner in Siler’s line, thence along it S 68 degrees E 35 poles to a stake by a white oak corner to Siler’s 100 acres and Snider’s part of the entire survey, thence along his line reversed S 4 ½ degrees E 96 poles to the beginning. Filed 22 Mar 1790. The 23 Apr 1779 survey is shown.
    Bedford Co PA Deed Book C, p. 54-55 (#977). Jacob Studebeger and Mary, his wife, yeoman of Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, to Jacob Snider, yeoman, of Virginia, in consideration of 189 pounds, 7 shillings, 6 pence, a tract of land situated in Croyles Valley, Bedford Co., beginning at a Spanish oak, thence by land of Barnard Dougherty N 79 ½ degrees, W 23 perches to a white oak, N 63 ½ degrees W 111 perches to a white oak, thence by vacant land N 13 degrees E 148 perches to a white oak, thence N 32 degrees W 31 perches to a red oak, thence by land of Henry Donnelly’s S 86 ½ degrees E 154 perches to a black oak, S 39 perches to a hickory, E 40 perches to a post, thence by land of George Moore S 13 degrees E 62 perches to a post, thence by land of William Henry S 42 degrees W 155 perches to place of beginning, containing 205 ¼ acres. Witnesses, Hugh Barclay, Felix Millar. Signed, Jacob Studenbecker and Mary (her X mark) Studebecker [sic]. Dated 10 Aug 1787.
    There is also an original survey by James Mortimer in the James Boor collection #105 dated 20 Oct 1791 for David Snider. This 98-acre parcel was part of a tract of land, “late the estate of Jacob Snider, deceased,” containing 205 acres pursuant to a warrant granted to Jacob Studebaker dated 10 Jan 1787. The survey is too poor to reproduce here, however, a resurvey was done 11 Mar 1814 by James Piper for the same David Snyder [sic]. It is quite clear, but the size is now 107 acres, 27 perches. Adjoining tracts in 1791 were owned by John Dearbaugh, Barnard Daugherty, illegible, Joseph Snider, and Jacob Studebaker. In 1814, the neighbors going counterclockwise were Simon Stookey, no name given, Phillip and Abraham Richey in right of Wm. Henry, Joseph Snyder, no name given. This resurvey is also given the #205 in the Boor collection. This is clearly David Snider’s share of the Pennsylvania land that Jacob Snider acquired of Jacob Studebaker.
    Northern Neck Grants, Vol. S, p. 336-337, Reel 298, Berkeley Co VA [Library of Virginia - online]. Edmund Randolph, Esq., Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, to Jacob Snider, in consideration of 5 shillings sterling, a tract containing 54 acres, by survey dated 23 Apr 1779, in Berkeley Co., adjoining William Firse and Snider’s own land, on the drains of Back Creek, bounded as follows: beginning at a small hickory on the east side of a drain corner to Jacob Siler’s three surveys, thence along the line of this 68 acres S 72 degrees E 40 poles to a twisted pine on the south side of a very brushy hill, thence N 40 degrees E 74 poles to a black oak on the east side of a ridge, thence N 50 degrees W 18 poles to two black oaks on the side of a brushy ridge, thence N 40 degrees E 60 poles to a Spanish oak and medium cedar in William Firse’s line, thence along it N 78 degrees W 19 poles to a pine on a pine hill at his corner, thence N 4 ½ degrees W 96 poles to a stake by a white oak which was corner to Siler’s 100 acres, thence in line with the same S 22 degrees W 225 poles to the beginning. The survey is in Vol. 1, p. 285, Reel 312. Dated 30 Nov 1787.
    Northern Neck Grants, Vol. T, p. 398-399, Reel 299, p. 336-337, Berkeley Co VA [Library of Virginia - online]. Beverley Randolph, Esq., Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia to Jacob Snider, in consideration of 6 shillings, 8 pence, a tract containing 44 acres bearing survey date of 5 Oct 1770, in Berkeley Co on the west side of North Mountain between the mountain and Back Creek, bounded as follows: beginning at a black oak, down the mountain N 27 degrees W 40 poles to two chestnut oaks on the east side of a very steep hill, thence N 40 degrees E 3 ½ poles and crossing a spring run from the mountain, continuing 211 ½ poles to three chestnut oaks on the west side of the hill, thence S 50 degrees E 80 poles to two small chestnut oaks on a very steep hill near halfway to the top of the mountain, thence S 52 degrees W 235 poles to the beginning. Dated 26 May 1789.
    The Pennsylvania tract and four Virginia tracts coincide with the bequests in Jacob Snider’s will with one not so small omission – the land purchased of Kennedy. This writer could not locate a Kennedy to Snider deed, but the Bedford Co PA records do show a Kennedy tract that was purchased by Jacob Studebaker. Studebaker later sold several parcels to Jacob Snider Jr (Bedford Co Deed #2036 dated 18 May 1796), but although the description is similar, Andrew Kennedy was not mentioned as a previous owner. Did the senior Jacob Snider have a stake in this land?
    Bedford Co PA Deed Book B, p. 198. Andrew Kenedy of the city of Philadelphia, merchant, did grant and bargain unto Jacob Studdybecker [sic] of Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, tract situated on Tussey’s Run formerly Cumberland County, now in the township of Providence, Bedford Co, in consideration of 160 pounds, beginning at a white oak, thence along John Moore’s land S 41 degrees, W 150 perches, to a post by Samuel Moore’s claim, S 115 perches to a post, thence S 80 degrees E 94 perches to a maple, thence S 10 degrees W 37 perches to a black oak, thence N 80 degrees E 50 perches to a white oak, thence by vacant land N 12 degrees 247 perches to a white oak, thence N 9 degrees E 40 perches to a white oak, thence N 85 degrees W 96 perches to the place of beginning, containing 222 acres, the warrant for the plantation dated 7 Jul 1762, was surveyed and laid out to a certain Charles Moore, who by indenture dated 11 Mar 1777 sold it to David Irwin, who by indenture dated 16 Apr 1778 sold the same to John Thompson, who by indenture dated 11 Dec 1779 sold the same to the aforesaid David Irwin, who by indenture dated 4 Oct 1784, sold the same to Andrew Kennedy [sic]. Witnessed by Hugh Barclay and David Espy. Dated 6 Feb 1786.
    Robert Kennedy, Jacob Snider, and Thomas Sharp were witnesses to a 30 Oct 1771, filed 5 Nov 1771 deed, John Breeson of Back Creek, Frederick Co VA, to Anthony Sells, 100 pounds, 90 acres on the north side of Back Creek, corner to Robert Kennedy [Frederick Co VA Deeds, Vol. 15, p. 185]. The three, Snider signing in German, also witnessed a deed, John Breeson to Frederick Frays, 120 pounds, for 142 acres, part of the same patent as above [Frederick Co VA Deeds, Vol. 15, p. 182-183]. Is this the Kennedy referred to in the Jacob Snider will?
    We have covered the available real estate records for Jacob Snider in Berkeley Co VA and Bedford Co PA, but the widow Margaret was a land owner in her own regard. It was extremely unusual for a female to purchase land unless in the accompaniment of a husband. Why did Margaret Snider leave the Back Creek plantation in which she had one-third dower and begin purchasing land in Pennsylvania? Perhaps the dispute over the Pennsylvania land mentioned in the Jacob Snider estate proceedings was a family dispute as well. Hopefully, a court case will someday be located. The Margaret Snider deeds are interesting and may give clues to her identity.
    Bedford Co PA Deed Book D, p. 419, John Gibson and Margaret, his wife, and William Gibson, all of Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, to Margret [sic] Snider, widow, of the same location, in consideration of 200 pounds, a parcel of land called “Union” situate in Croyle’s Cove, late Cumberland Co, now Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, beginning at a hickory, thence by land of Hugh Ferguson N 70 degrees W 116 perches to a white oak, thence by Charles Moore’s warranted land N --- E 168 perches to a Spanish oak, thence by land of Joseph Morrison E --- 61 ½ perches to a post by Tussey’s Mountain, S 15 degrees W 87 perches to an ash, S 70 degrees W 34 perches to a white oak, S 15 degrees W 65 perches to the beginning, containing 82 ¾ acres; said tract was surveyed in pursuance of an application No. 933 dated 1 Aug 1766 granted to Charles Mortimer, who by deed dated 1 Sept 1774 conveyed the same to David McRouy, who by deed dated 30 Jun 1777 sold the same to John Moore, who by deed dated 1 Mar 1779 conveyed the same to the said John & William Gibson, for whom a warrant of acceptance was issued 17 Feb 1795. Witnessed by Martin Riley and James Mortimer. Signed by John Gibson, Margret [her X mark] Gibson, and William Gibson. Dated 30 Jun 1795. Survey from James Boor collection #1297.
    Bedford Co PA Deed Book D, p. 420, John Gibson and Margret [sic], his wife, and William Gibson, all of Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, to Margret Snider, widow, of the same location, in consideration of 300 pounds, a parcel of land called “Partnership” situate in Croyle’s Valley, late Cumberland Co, now Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, beginning at a Spanish oak, thence by land of Charles Moore SW 168 perches to a white oak, N 85 degrees W 96 perches to a white oak, thence by land of John Moore and vacant land N 30 degrees E 201 perches to a post, thence by land of William Parker and Joseph Morrison S 20 degrees E 33 perches to an ash, E 46 perches to a white oak, S 75 degrees E 14 perches to a hickory, and S 55 degrees E 52 perches to the beginning, containing 112 ½ acres; the said tract surveyed in pursuance of a warrant dated 12 Mar 1763, granted to the said Charles Moore, who by deed dated 2 Jan 1770 conveyed the same to John Mortimer, who by deed dated 1 Sep 1774 conveyed the same to David McRouy, who by deed dated 30 Jun 1777 conveyed the same to John Moore, who by deed dated 1 Mar 1779 conveyed the same to the said John and William Gibson, for whom a patent was issued 30 Mar 1795. Witnessed by Martin Reiley and James Mortimer. Signed by John Gibson, Margret [her X mark] Gibson, and William Gibson. Dated 30 Jun 1795.
    Bedford Co PA Deed Book D, p. 418, John Gibson and Margret [sic], his wife, of Bedford Twp., Bedford Co PA, to Margret Snyder [sic], widow, of Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, in consideration of 50 pounds, a parcel of land called “Plainfield” situate on the west side of Tussey’s Mountain in Providence Twp., beginning at a hickory, thence by land of said Margret Snyder N 13 degrees E 65 perches to a white oak, N 68 degrees E 34 perches to an ash, thence by land of the Widow Morrison N 13 degrees E 195 perches to a hickory, thence by Tussey’s Mountain N 84 degrees E 41 perches to a chestnut oak, S 13 degrees W 48 perches to a chestnut oak, N 88 degrees E 11 perches to a chestnut oak, S 18 degrees W 230 perches to a chestnut oak, N 87 degrees W 60 perches to the beginning, containing 78 acres, 42 perches; said tract surveyed in pursuance of a warrant dated 4 Sep 1786 granted to the said John Gibson, with patent issued 13 Mar 1795. Witnessed by Martin Reiley and James Mortimer. Signed John Gibson and Margaret [her X mark] Gibson. Dated 11 Sep 1795.

    Bedford Co PA Deed Book E, p. 14-15, Margret [sic] Snider, widow, of Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, to John Hendricks, yeoman, of the same location, in consideration of 183 pounds, 6 shillings, 8 pence, “part of” three tracts on the waters of Tussey’s Run in Croyle’s Valley, viz., Partnership, Union, and Plainfield, as described in the three purchase deeds above. The full acreage is given for each tract but the total received by Hendricks was 91 acres, 46 perches, being the north part. Witnessed by Jno. Scott and James Mortimer. Signed, Margret [her M mark] Snider. Dated 6 Sep 1796.
    Bedford Co PA Deed Book I, p. 24-27, Margaret Snyder [sic], widow, of Bedford Co PA, to John Snyder of the same location, in consideration of 1310 pounds, two patents bearing date 30 Mar 1795 in the name of John Gibson and William Gibson, a tract called “Partnership,” beginning at a Spanish oak, thence by land of Charles Moor [sic], SW 180 perches to a white oak, thence N 85 degrees W 96 perches to a white oak, thence by land of John Moor and vacant land N 30 degrees E 209 perches to a post, thence by land of William Parker and Joseph Morrison S 20 degrees E 33 perches to an ash, E 46 perches to a white oak, thence S 75 degrees E 14 perches to a hickory, and S 55 degrees E 52 perches to the place of beginning, contained 112 ½ acres; another tract called “Union” situate in Croyle’s Cove, Providence Twp., beginning at a hickory, thence by land of Hugh Ferguson N 70 degrees W 115 perches to a white oak, thence by land of Charles Moor NE 158 perches to a Spanish oak, thence by land of Joseph Morrison E 61 ½ perches to a post, thence S 70 degrees W 34 perches to a white oak, thence S 15 degrees W 65 perches to the place of beginning, containing 82 ¾ acres; and another tract called “Plainfield,” assigned to John Gibson by patent 13 Mar 1795, on the west side of Tussey’s Mountain in Providence Twp, beginning at a hickory, thence by land of Margaret Snyder N 13 degrees E 65 perches to a white oak, thence N 68 degrees E 34 perches to an ahs, thence by the same land and land of Widow Morrison N 13 degrees E 195 perches to a hickory, thence by Tussey’s Mountain S 84 degrees E 41 perches to a chestnut oak, thence S 13 degrees W 48 perches to a chestnut oak, thence N 88 degrees E 11 perches to a chestnut, S 18 degrees W 230 perches to a chestnut oak, thence N 87 degrees 60 perches to the beginning, containing 78 acres, 42 perches. The said John Snider to receive a “part of” the three tracts totaling 182 acres, the residue of the described three tracts having been sold to Jacob Snider. Witnessed by Christopher Reiley and Christian Breck. Signed, Margaret [her X mark] Snyder. Dated 5 Dec 1812. Christopher Reiley, Justice of the Peace, got acknowledgment of Margaret Snider [sic] as to receipt of the payment and recorded the deed 30 Nov 1813. [This is the southern portion of the three tracts].
    These deeds indicate that Margaret Snider was living in Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA as early as 1795, five years after the death of her husband, and that she herself did not die until sometime after 1812. The northern part of her three tracts was sold to John Hendricks but ended up in the hands of Jacob Snider, the brother-in-law of Hendricks. I have not found the conveyance, but the younger Jacob Snider’s deed to his son Jacob for $1867 on 10 Jun 1815 (Bedford Co PA Deeds, Vol. I, p. 560-561) stated in the tract history that John Hendricks conveyed the acreage to Jacob Snider by deed dated 28 Apr 1807. This is the northern part. Another grandson, John Snider, called “Ashey John” purchased the southern portion, also for a large sum, as related in detail above. A story handed down by descendants recalls that several family members got extra religious and believed that salvation was soon coming. They gave up their land and belongings and ascended the mountain to have a “love feast” and wait for the Messiah to appear. Ashey John ended up with all the Snider land and those who lost out in the deal removed to Ohio. There is no documentation for this but several Snider children did move to Ohio about 1806-1807. One account dates the love feast to the 1820s, much too late for the story to be true.
    Census and tax records are a third reference which genealogists often used and our Snider family are mentioned. In the 1787 personal property tax list for Berkeley Co VA, Jacob Snider is listed with 2 taxable males over 21, 13 horses, 38 cows, and a stud horse. He also was charged with taxes for Richd. Eacles, Davd. Snider, and Jno. Henry. Maybe some of these were employees? [The 1787 Census of Virginia, by Nettie Schreiner-Yantis and Florene Speakman Love, p. 1416]. Although this is an alphabetical listing, Balsor Snider was not far away, and this name might be checked for those unsure yet of our Jacob Snider’s heritage.
    In 1790 Bedford Co PA, p. 236, we find several connected to the Snider clan, almost all side by side: James Mortemore, John Hendricks, John Snider, Jacob Snider, John Gibson, Jacob Studebaker, and a second Jacob Snider. Now, who is this fellow? The grandchildren were not old enough in 1790 to be head of a household. The first Jacob Snider, neighbors Hughey Forgeson and John Gibson, had 1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 1 female. The second Jacob Snider, neighbors Potiting (?) Holler and Hendrey Holler, had 1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 6 females. The census enumeration date for 1790 was August 2nd, so our Jacob Snider Sr was deceased. Could Margaret Snider have been in Pennsylvania at that time with the household listed under her deceased husband’s name? The 1790 Virginia census was unfortunately destroyed by fire. The 1787 tax list is a substitute but does not answer this question.
    Margret Snider, Widow, first appears on tax lists in Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA in 1796, with 180 acres, 50 of those improved, 2 houses, 1 barn, 3 horses, and 3 cows, all valued at $752. Neighbors were John Hendricks and Simon Stucky.
    Margaret Snider took the oath of allegiance in Bedford Co PA in 1796. She owned 100 acres, 2 houses, 1 barn, 3 cows and $7521 in cash. Such wealth was unusual and perhaps this is the soul reason that she started buying more land.
    In 1797, Margaret Snider, Widow, paid $2.60 in taxes in Providence Twp. Her neighbors were John Hendricks and Simon Stuckey.
    Margret Snider, Widow, paid $1.74 tax in 1798 Providence Twp., with neighbors John Hendricks and Simon Stuckey.
    Margaret Snyder, Widow, appears on the 1798 Direct Tax for Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA. In the “B” list, or the “Particular List or Description of all Lands, Lots, Buildings and Wharves,” Margaret is listed with 1 shingled dwelling house, measuring 26 by 22 feet, valued at $80; and 1 barn measuring 41 x 18 feet. She had 180 acres valued at $720, the adjoining proprietor being Hugh Ferguson.
    Margaret Snider, Widow, appears on the 1799 Providence Twp tax list, and had 180 acres, 2 horses, and 4 cows. This is an alphabetical listing.
    In 1800, under Providence & Colerain Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 407, we find Margaret Snyder with 1 male under 10, 2 males 16-26, and 1 female over 45. The listing is alphabetical so we cannot determine the neighbors. Margaret Snider paid $1.40 in the 1800 Providence Twp tax list, an alphabetical listing.
    Margaret Snider paid $4.21 in tax in Providence Twp in 1802 (alphabetical).
    In 1804 Providence Twp taxes, Margaret Snider has 180 acres patent land, valued at $1381, with 1 horse and 3 cows. She must have had a solid house for that valuation.
    Margaret Snider appears on the 1805 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), tax paid $2.59.
    In 1806, Margaret Snider is in the Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical) again paying $2.59.
    Margaret Snider appears in the 1808 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical) with 170 acres patent land, 1 horse, occupation – farmer, and a total value of $780.
    In 1810 Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 556, the Widow Snider is listed all by herself, 1 female over 45. Neighbors were Joseph Davis and John Stickler, Sr. The family was all nearby – the Widow Mortimer, Wm. Snider, Jacob Snider, Joseph Snider, and David Snider.
    In the 1811 Providence Twp tax list, Margaret Snider, widow, appears with 100 acres patented land, 1 horse, 3 cows, with a value of $188.
    When I was personally in the Bedford Co Courthouse several years ago, I copied tax lists and I thought I had found Margaret Snider on the 1812 list but not 1813; however, James Boor’s extensive publications on Bedford Co tax lists jump from 1811 to 1814. I have not relocated my old notes. Regardless, Margaret Snider made a deed selling the last of her land on 5 Dec 1812 which was recorded 30 Nov 1813. She certainly died after 1812, yet we cannot say 1813 with certainty on the basis of tax lists, because she no longer had property to be taxed.
    By 1820, Joseph and Jacob Snider are living in the home neighborhood (p. 84), but Margaret Snider is not to be found and is believed to have been deceased.
    This writer has long wondered if Margaret Snider was related to the Gibson family, from whom she purchased the three tracts of land pictured above. It just seems strange that Jacob Snider would not want any of his children to go with his wife Margaret if she remarried, and then when she did remain a widow, she still gave up her Berkeley County plantation, removed to the Snake Spring Valley in Pennsylvania near some of her children, and started to purchase land instead of simply living with one of them. If Jacob Snider Sr had already moved to Bedford Co PA at the time of his death (two entries in 1790 census), then this would not be a question to ponder. She may simply have been buying land from her nearest neighbor from the estate dower in order to assist the children who did not receive land from Jacob’s will.
    I am not going to attempt to prove the parentage of Jacob Snider here, but a Henricks/Snider cousin, Jane Shaffer Elsmere, in her book “Shaffer-Rudy Family History”, published in North Manchester IN, 2001, p. 207-213, identifies Jacob as the possible son of Johannes Schneider of Solingen, Rheinland, and his wife Catharine Elisabeth Henckel. She believes that this family emigrated to America in 1736 on the ship “Harle” with the Stutenbecker family, also from Solingen. Mrs. Elsmere believes that Jacob Snider’s wife was indeed Margaret Studebaker, as family tradition relates (or rather Becker), a daughter of Johannes Becker (Studebaker). These families were associated with the Skippack Reformed Church in Skippack Twp., Philadelphia (later Montgomery) Co PA, removed to Antrim Twp., Cumberland (later Franklin) Co PA, and then affiliated with the Kreider’s (St. Benjamin’s) Reformed Church in the Pipe Creek area of Frederick (later Carroll) Co MD. This land was disputed by PA and the Snider’s had a son, Abraham, baptized 16 Apr 1769 at the Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in Lancaster PA, according to Mrs. Elsmere. They soon removed to Back Creek, Berkeley Co VA (later West Virginia) with several Brethren (German Baptist) families, including Fox, Miller, and Stuckey. [An earlier chart submitted by Jane Elsmere, 1991, identified Christian and Susanna Margretha Schneider as Jacob’s parents, and listed Jacob Snider with a first marriage 12 Nov 1751 Philadelphia Co (now Montgomery Co) PA to Maria Magdalena Lang, daughter of Elias Lang, baptized 9 Apr 1732 Philadelpha Co PA, having three children – Jacob, John, and Mary; and then a second wife, Margaret Studebaker, whom Jacob Snider would have married about 1761, having the remainder of the children. This theory must have been dropped – Elsmere to Neel, 28 Aug 1991].
    Jane Elsmere also suggests that John Henricks may have entered the employ of John Gibson, a land speculator, and went to Bedford Co PA where Gibson had extensive land holdings. She adds that “he met Jacob Studebaker who acted as agent for his father-in-law Jacob Snider in the purchase of land in Providence Township from Gibson.” Although the Bedford Co deeds are referenced in the footnote, Elsmere does not note that these purchases were made by Margaret Snider alone some five years after the death of her husband and that Jacob Studebaker was not mentioned, not even as a witness to the deeds. Jane’s book has a storyline, but the reader cannot tell if she is making up the scenario or if she has references for each of these tidbits. Was John Gibson any more of a land speculator than Margaret Snider?
    Many researchers discount the tradition that Margaret Snider was a Studebaker. This maiden name started appearing in print in the 1920s and has been repeated extensively. Descendant Ernest Snider even titles his web site the “Hoax of Jacob Schneider of Back Creek, Virginia.” There is no contemporary evidence identifying Margaret as a Studebaker. We should indeed be very wary about identifying Margaret as a Studebaker on tradition alone. On the other hand, if we did not accept anything in our family history unless we had concrete legal proof, we would, I am afraid, not get very far. Half the fun is being first to prove one of these parental theories. We always have to be open to new ideas and willing to change our own course if discounted.
    Some researchers have different parents for our Jacob Snider. C.Woodrow Snider in the early 1980s commented: “Our recent trip to Lancaster Co PA has clearly established, at least as far as I am concerned, that Jacob Snider II, of Rapho Twp., Lancaster Co PA, is or was the father of Jacob Snider III, of Berkeley County, VA [Letter C. Woodrow Snider to Tom Neel, 31 Dec 1982]. This older Jacob Sneider [sic], along with Christian Schneider and Mathew/Matheis Schneider, came to Philadelphia on the ship Allen 15 Sep 1729 with a group of Brethren settlers led by Alexander Mack [European Origins of the Brethren, by Donald F. Durnbaugh, p. 296-297, and Pennsylvania German Pioneers, v. 3, p. 16]. However, in his published 1982 work, “Snider: Lineage & Genealogy of George Washington Snider, Jr.,” C. Woodrow Snider points out that longtime Snyder-Snider-Schneider Data Letter editor, Robert Longbottom, informed him that the Rapho Township Jacob Snider made his will 12 Dec 1793, proved 11 Mar 1794, some three years after our Jacob Snider of Berkeley Co VA had died. “People just don’t will dead people things of value,” Snider commented (p. 72). However, most of the online submitters to the various family group web sites we use in 2007 seem to identify Jacob as the father. A few copy the next theory.
    Robert Longbottom, suggests that Jacob Snider is a son of Christian Snider of Earl Twp., Lancaster Co PA. Christian Sneder’s [sic] will was made there 16 Jun 1789 and was entered into the court records 21 Feb 1793, naming a son Jacob Schneder [sic], among others. Peter Diller, Adam Miller, and Jacob Beck served as witnesses. Executors were John Brubacher and John Luther. No wife is named. The problem with this theory is that unlike the Snider’s of Woodbury Twp., Bedford Co PA, our family in Providence Twp did not use the forename Christian. Since Jacob Snider of Berkeley Co VA died between the making and probate of the will, the Lancaster Co PA estate packet, if it exists, should note this in the executor’s distribution of funds.
    Jane Elsmere mentioned the baptism of Abraham Schneider at Trinity Lutheran Church in Lancaster PA in her account, and I believe that Robert Longbottom and others had previously found the same reference, but the age and the other children did not fit neatly into the package. These records have been transcribed in detail by Debra D. Smith and Frederick S. Weiser (1995) in “Trinity Lutheran Church Records, Lancaster, Pennsylvania,” Vol. 1-3, and should be examined more closely. Joh. Abraham Schneider, son of Jacob and Margareth Schneider, was baptized 16 Apr 1769, sponsors Christian Lutz and wife Barbara (p. 5 of original). No birth date is given. Another child, Johann Michael Schneider, son of Jacob and Maria Margaretha Schneider, was born 18 Nov 1770 and baptized 13 Jun 1771; sponsors, Michael Sohn and daughter Salome (p. 30 of original).
    There were other Schneider families in the Trinity Lutheran record at this time. Mathias and Sahra [sic] had a daughter Margaretha on 31 Oct 1770, a daughter Catharina on 12 Jan 1775, a son Jacob on 15 Apr 1773; and Johann and Elisabeth Schneider had a son Johann on 9 Dec 1769, a son Jacob on 25 Nov 1774 (sponsor Jacob Schneider).
    Communion records add more to the story. At the time of Abraham’s baptism, the communicants list for the Holy Communion on Jubilate Sunday dates from 9-13 Apr 1769. Communicants included Mathey Schneider and his wife Sarah, and Jacob Schneider. On 14 May 1769, the Communion on Pentecost, Jacobina Schneiderin and Regina Schneiderin are found in the record. Holy Communion was again held on the 24th Sunday after Trinity 1769 (Nov 5) and we find Jacob Schneider and Peter Schneider with his wife Catharina on the list. Holy Communion on the Sunday after Easter in 1770 is most impressive. Jacob Schneider and wife Margaretha are on the list (p. 386 of original), and under the heading “Married and unmarried persons and children who went to the table of the Lord for the first time on the first Sunday after Easter (1770),” we find Jacob Schneider, age 15 (p. 387 of original), and on the next page, Barbara Schneiderin, age 16. Beside her entry, it says she lived 3 miles from the church. This birth date for Jacob Schneider computes to 1755, the same birth year on the tombstone of our Jacob Jr in Snake Spring Valley, Bedford Co PA, and Jacob and Margareth Schneider are in the church for the same service. This has to be the right family. Jacob Schneider and wife Margaretha last attended Communion on 9 Feb 1772. Agnesa Schneiderin was the only other of that surname on the list of communicants that day.
    The only problem is a list appearing in the Pennsylvania Archives, Second Series, Vol. II, p. 466-477. Under date 10 Apr 1767, “The Persons hereafter named, being Foreigners, and of the People called Quakers, and other Protestants who conscientiously scruple to take an Oath, severally took the Affirmation and made and repeated the Declaration according to the Directions of the act of the thirteenth of King George the second, entitled ‘an Act for naturalizing such foreign Protestants,” include: Stephen Ulrick, Michael Miller, Conrad Fox, Jacob Shnyder [sic], Simon Stucky, and Philip Jacob Miller, all residing in Frederick County, in Maryland. Current Frederick County is a couple counties distant from Lancaster Co PA, separated by York and Baltimore counties which did exist in 1767; but in the other direction, land in what is current Bedford Co PA far to the west was being sold in 1767 Frederick Co MD and Berkeley Co VA is even closer. Can we accept Jacob Snider moving back and forth in the years leading up to the war, or is this a different Jacob and Margaret Snider? Simon Stucky is a relative. The name Michael Miller does appear in Trinity Lutheran church records, and yes, the Becker family has a few entries there also. Margaret Snider could indeed be a Becker/Studebaker. It would have been better if the marriage had been recorded in this church. It wasn’t!
    In reviewing earlier records for Trinity Lutheran Church in Lancaster PA, we find that one Johannes Schneider, a married man, aged 42 years, 5 months, 14 days, died 6 Aug 1760 and was buried the following day (p. 276 of original). He first appears in the Communion list for 10 Oct 1747 “in the presence of the elders to Peter Brunholtz” and is listed as follows – “Johannes Schneider, his wife Reformed.” His wife is not named. At Holy Communion on 15 Oct 1751 with Pastor Wagener, several Schneiders appears side by side on the list of names – Carl Schneider, his wife Anna Margr., Matthaeus Schneider, Maria Elies. Schneiderin, and Maria Luise Schneiderin. One Melchior Schneider and his wife Marg. Fridenia had a daughter, Marie Rosina, b. 24 Nov 1744. They had several other children recorded in the Moravian Church at Lancaster.
    There are many possibilities for the parents of our Jacob Snider of Berkeley Co VA. I still don’t think we have answered the question for certain.
    There are various other mentions of Jacob and Margaret Snider in the Virginia and Pennsylvania records.
    Ernest L. Snider, Rochester NY, submitted several items to the Snyder-Snider-Schneider Data Letter in September 1985 (Issue 17, p. 166-167), including reference to some Frederick Co MD deeds:

  • Daniel Dulany to Jacob Snider, 22 May 1764 – Liber J, folio 467
  • Valentine Best to Jacob Snider, 19 Nov 1766 – Liber K, folio 786
  • Stephen Ulrick to Jacob Snider, 17 Mar 1768 – Liber L, folio 223
  • Daniel Ulrick to Jacob Snider, 29 Jun 1769 – Liber M, folio 305
  • Stephen Ulrick to Jacob Snider, 29 Jun 1769 – Liber M, folio 315
  • Daniel Shelby to Jacob Snider, 23 Sep 1769 – Liber M, folio 486
  • Valentine Best to Jacob Snider, 2 Dec 1769 – Liber M, folio 618
  • Jacob Snider to George Shaver, 22 Apr 1770 – Liber N, folio 123

  • George Shaver was the second husband of Barbara (Fox) Stuckey, husband of Simon Stuckey Sr who appeared on Frederick Co (now Washington Co) MD lists with Jacob Snider.
    Upon closer inspection, some of these deeds certainly apply to our Jacob and Margaret Snider and some apply to the other men with the name Jacob Snider in the same area. The last deed given pins down our Jacob Snider.
    Frederick Co MD Deeds, Liber N, p. 123-125 (Andersen, 2003, p. 20):
    “George Shaver recorded deed 22 May 1770, made 7 May 1770 between Jacob Snider of Frederick County, for L400 sells the following tracts, part of Good Neighbour, 106 acres; Stoney Hill, beginning at tract called Germany, 16 acres; a part of tract Germany, on a line with Daniel Albrich’s 86 acre part of said tract; containing 66 acres, and part of Resurvey on Mountain of Wales, containing 31 acres. Signed by mark, Jacob Snider before Evan Shelby, Thomas Prather. Receipt. Acknowledgment and Margaret, wife of Jacob Snider, relinquished dower. Alienation fine paid.”
    Moving backwards to the purchase of each of these named tracts, I’ll again quote from the fine abstracts prepared by former Western Maryland Genealogy editor, Patricia Abelard Andersen.
    Frederick Co MD Deeds, Liber M, p. 305-306 (Andersen, 2000, p. 37):
    “Jacob Snider recorded 29 June 1769, made 10 June between Daniel Ulrich of Frederick County, for L30 sells tract, Stony Hill, on 12th line of tract, High Germany, metes & bounds for 16 acres. Signed by mark before Evan Shelby, Thos. Prather. Receipt. Acknowledged and Christiana, wife of Daniel, released dower rights. Alienation fine paid.”
    Frederick Co MD Deeds, Liber M, p. 315-316 (Andersen, 2000, p. 38):
    “Jacob Snider recorded 29 June 1769, made 10 June between Stephen Ulrich of Frederick County, having by indenture 31 May 1755 between Stephen Ulrich and Daniel Ulrich, for consideration therein granted 86 acres called Germany, as recorded in Liber E: 590-591, the said Daniel and Stephen has discovered that the alienation on the said deed was not paid until 20 November 1754, being out of time limited for paying such alienation, the indenture aforesaid became void and of no effect, now this indenture witnessed that the said Stephen Ulrich by consent of the said Daniel Ulrich for L120 grants and sells 66 acres, part of the aforesaid 86 acres. Signed Daniel Ulrich by mark, Stephen Ulrich in German script, before Thos. Prather, Evan Shelby. Receipt. Acknowledged and Cristena, wife of Daniel Ulrich, before Evan Shelby, Thos. Prather. Alienation fine paid.”
    Frederick Co MD Deeds, Liber M, p. 486-487 (Andersen, 2000, p. 51):
    “Jacob Snider recorded 23 September 1769, made 22 August, between David Shelby, for L39 sells tract, Resurvey on the Mountain of Wales, 31 acres. Signed David Shelby before Thos. Prather, Lewis Gavelin. Receipt. Acknowledgment. Alienation fee paid.”
    These deeds cover purchases for all the tracts sold by our Jacob Snider in 1770 except for Good Neighbour. I do not find that tract purchase, but the two Valentine Best deeds that Ernest L. Snider located refer to a tract with the similar name of Friendship Agreement. This may or may not be our Jacob Snider. Again, I am quoting from the Frederick Co., Maryland deeds abstracts by Patricia Abelard Andersen.
    Frederick Co MD Deeds, Liber K, p. 786-787 (Andersen, 1997, p. 66):
    “Jacob Snider recorded 19 Nov 1766, made 19 Nov 1766 between Valentine Baist of Frederick County, for L66 Penn., sells tract in Frederick Co., being part of Resurvey on Friendship, beginning at tract of land called the Three Springs, metes and bounds given for 75 acres. Signed Valentine Baist before Wm. Luckett, Thos. Price. Receipt. Acknowledgment of Valentine Baist and Catherine, his wife, released dower. Alienation fine paid.”
    Frederick Co MD Deeds, Liber M, p. 618-619 (Andersen, 2000, p 64):
    “Jacob Snider recorded 2 December 1769, made (month and day blank) 1769 between Valentine Baist. For L5.10 sells part of tract Friendship Agreement, metes and bounds for 22 ½ acres. Signed in German script, Valentin Bast, before Thos. Price, Ans. Campbell. Receipt. Acknowledgement, Catharine Baist released dower rights. Alienation fine paid.”
    It should be noted that Valentine Best sold other portions of Friendship aka Friendship Agreement aka Resurvey on Friendship to John Frush (75 acres – K:784-786), George Anstad (125 acres – K:788-789), Peter Erb (25 acres – K:789-790), Henry Crabs (100 acres – K:790-792), John Coster (13 ¾ acres – M:610-612, Michael Cookus (18 ¾ acres – M:614-615, and John Bishop (100 acres – M:620-621). Again, this may not be our Jacob Snider.
    There is a Jacob Snider, who with Valentine Bentz [sic] and others, served on a Frederick Co MD jury 2 Jan 1783 concerning the death of Negro Bosen the evening prior. The cause of death was determined to be natural causes as he had “been in sickly health prior to his death” [Folder 40298-6, Coroners Inquests, in Inhabitants of Frederick County, Maryland, Vol. 1, 1750-1790, by Stefanie R. Shaffer, p. 80]. Snider was also paid a witness fee for the State vs. John Able, Aug Term 1787 [Ibid., p. 116]. Our Jacob Snider should have been in Virginia by the time of these events, so the Best/Snider items probably do not refer to ours. There are several land Frederick Co MD land transactions into the 1790s for a Jacob Snider Jr. Land patents under the name Jacob Snider exist in Frederick Co MD in 1770 for Snider’s Garden, 25 acres; and in 1785 for Snider’s Content, 13 acres [Shaffer, Vol. 2, p. 97]. The point is that it is a common name and we must carefully pick out our Jacob.
    The first Frederick Co MD tract in Ernest L. Snider’s list, the 1764 Dulaney deed (J:467-468), is definitely not our Jacob Snider, as in a sale of this parcel to Philip Granther 5 Oct 1765 (K:6-7), Jacob Snider’s wife, Anna Maria Snider, is examined apart and releases her right of dower.
    Quoting a paragraph from the Jane Elsmere book (mentioned above), p. 209-210, “Between then [1759] and 1763 Jacob and Margaret Snider moved to the Pipe Creek area of Frederick (later Carroll) County, Maryland. They were among the first members of St. Benjamin’s (Kreider’s) Reformed Church there. Membership of the new church was composed largely of people from Montgomery County, York County, and Cumberland County in Pennsylvania. Signatures appended to the Articles of Union on 4 April 1763 included those of Peter Croll, Dewalt Jung, George Schneider, and Jacob Schneider (Snider). Jacob Snider and his family soon severed their connection with the church, and no further mention of the family can be found in its records.” I’m not sure how we can determine if this is our Jacob Snider without finding a baptism for a child. These church records were translated by C. T. Zahn and Frederick S. Weiser and published by the Historical Society of Carroll County in the Maryland German Church Records series, Vol. 9. In fact, the names Jacob Schneider and Gorg Scheider [sic] do appear on the member list, but this same Vallendin Bast [sic] is the previous signature [Zahn & Weiser, p. 30-31, p. 162 in original].
    And before we get too ingrained with Frederick Co MD roots, John Stanwood Martin’s 1992 work, Genealogical Index to Frederick County, Maryland, The First Hundred Years, Vol. IV, p. 168, notes a Jacob Snyder, died 1800, aged 67 years, who named a wife Margaret in his will (GM 3:395) and children, Jacob Schneider, Mary Fair, Catherine Westler, and Margaret Bear. There are multiple Snider couples with the names Jacob and Margaret! This gives one a headache, doesn’t it?
    Ernest L. Snider also mentioned in the Snyder Data Letter that Jacob Snider was on the Berkeley Co VA Rent Rolls in 1772, 1776, and 1777 with land from Jackson. Jacob Snider was taxed in 8 Dec 1789 with 11 horses, in Berkeley Co (Book A, p. 47), and was assessed personal property tax for 1790 on 3 Feb 1791 (Book A, p. 68).
    There must have been multiple Jacob Snider’s in Berkeley Co. the 1798 House and Slave tax shows a Jacob Snider in Shepherdstown, taxed with $420 value. This is after our Jacob Snider was dead and after Jacob Jr was in Pennsylvania.
    Jacob Snider’s Revolutionary War service is a story in itself. So much has been written in early genealogical works, but many descendants of Jacob Snider applied to the Daughters of the American Revolution and picked out a soldier. Now, it is difficult to tell what is correct and what is a different Jacob Snider. John Hale Stutesman published an article entitled, “A Revolutionary War Company of Maryland Militia Which Included Members of the Dunker Community,” which appeared in the magazine, Mennonite Family History, in January 1966 [Vol. XV, No. 1, p. 41]. This roster, “A List of Captain Baker’s Company,” was recorded in the Spring of 1778 and includes members of many of the pacifist families of Washington Co MD, including Jacob Snyder, John Snyder, and Jacob Stockey. Henry Butterbaugh (on the list) married a daughter of Stephen Ulrick Sr., the man who made a land sale in Frederick Co to Jacob Snider. Again, we need to check to see if this is the correct Jacob, the one with the wife Margaret, or the one with the wife Anna Mary.
    Researcher Ernest L. Snider comments on his web site about Jacob Snider hoaxes – “I do believe that Jacob Schneider did contribute wheat for the Revolutionary Army.” He cites Military Public Services Claims, Certificate No. 376, Berkeley Co., “Certificate that Jacob Snider and Frederick Firse Contributed Wheat for Revolutionary Army’s Use.” This was dated 2 Oct 1780, No. 92, Virginia State Library. Ernest Snider comments that our Jacob’s land bordered that the William Firse family. He doesn’t put any merit in the paragraph by Helen Greenburg found in the Christine Bergen Papers (p. 219), Berkeley Co WV – “Father and son served in the French and Indian War and the Revolutionary War in Berkeley County Va. The Va. Order Book recommended Jacob Snider Sr as a Lt of the Militia 18 Sep 1781. Jacob Snider Captain, sworn as Captain of the Militia of Berkeley County Va 1781. In the year 1780 the Army of Virginia camped on the land of Jacob Snider Sr and he personally provided provisions for the Army. For this he maintained his title. The Public Claims were the Liberty Bonds of the Rev. War and were taken as War Tax and the ancestor who received the Warrants were not paid for two or more years there after. Jacob Snider Sr and Jr names appeared on the list.” It is particularly unlikely that the Jacob Snider who served at Fort Morris and Fort Bedford in the 1757-1758 period was our man, who should have been in eastern Pennsylvania at that time.
    We haven’t talked yet about occupation. Don C. Wood has a fine article called “Snyder’s Mill” published in The Berkeley Journal, Issue 9, 1980, p. 53-54. The Berkeley County Historical Society ran a special issue on Back Creek Valley and Jones Springs, Issue 30, 2004, and this contains an article called “The Snyder Homestead,” p. 24-28, which contains additional material about what was called the mill lot.
    The Snyder Mill was located on Back Creek east of Jones Springs in the area today known as the Swinging Bridge. When Abraham Snider died in 1845, his will (Berkeley Co VA Wills, Vol. 15, p. 32) called for the disposal of the property which was divided into Lot #1, a 331 acre Mansion House tract, and Lot #2, a 198 acre Mill lot to the northeast which included the mill, a mill race, and the mill dam. This Lot #2 with the mill was sold 6 April 1846 to Robert Penery for $642.21 (Berkeley Co VA Deeds, Vol. 53, p. 301).
    According to Don C. Wood, the mill tract was part of 140 acres that Jacob Snider had been granted 17 Feb 1773, to which he added the adjoining 176 acres of Robert Jackson’s land, and another adjoining 44 acre tract 26 May 1789. The mill was built previous to Jacob Snider’s 1790 death but was first identified as a grist mill on an 1809 map made by Charles Varle.
    After the Civil War, the mill property was sold 12 Jan 1869 by Special Commissioner Edmund Pendleton to Peter Hess after two suits were brought against Penery for debits owed [Berkeley Co WV Deeds, Vol. 66, p. 204]. Peter Hess’s will in 1886 left his real estate to his daughters, Elizabeth and her husband Robert Murphy, and Mary Ann Canby with her husband, although the mill isn’t mentioned specifically [Berkeley Co WV Wills, Vol. 23, p. 236]. According to Wood’s account, the old Snyder grist mill was destroyed in the Johnstown flood of 1889. The Snyder mansion house is also gone, the present home being built in 1847 after Abraham Snider sold the property. The dam across the creek is also no more.
    The 331 acre mansion property was sold at auction by C. J. Faulkner and E. B. Hill, Special Commissioners, in 1870 as a result of the same suits, to George Snyder, the highest bidder, for $1,472.95 [Berkeley Co WV Deeds, Vol. 369, p. 155-156). A newspaper advertisement describes “some 150 acres of said farm are under cultivation, near one-half of which is good Back Creek bottom. There are on the farm two comfortable houses, a barn, blacksmith shop and other outbuildings, a good orchard, and a well of good water. The farm is valuable and desirable” [New Era, 12 May 1870]. The land stayed with the Snyder family until 1918 [Berkeley Co WV Deed of Trust, Vol. 14, p. 134].
    In conjunction with the Snyder Mill, Ernest L. Snider makes an interesting observation on his web site that Jacob Schneider was an owner of Royal Mine that contained lead copper and tin ore, used to make gunmetal. This is located at the Swinging Bridge site near Jones Springs, WV. A researcher named Theresa Culley has a web posting (1997 – culley.5@osu.edu) about Nicholas Marquette, a Revolutionary War veteran, last mentioned in the 1810 census, who had an ironworks near Martinsburg WV. He had two daughters, Margaret, who married Jacob Snyder, and Anna, who married a Kennedy. The Snider homestead was originally surveyed 20 Sep 1750 by John Mauzy for Daniel Cannady, with Hugh Miller and William Snodgrass serving as chain bearers. This 276 acre tract was the one to which Robert Jackson was granted titled in 1766 [Northern Neck Land Grants, Vol. N, p. 226], and is the same land that our Jacob Snider purchased from Jackson in 1771 {Frederick Co VA Deeds, Vol. 14, p. 149-150]. I haven’t had much luck pursuing this clue, but it would give an alternative to those who do not believe the Studebaker tradition for Margaret Snider’s maiden name.
    It is certain that the study of this family will take many more turns as we find new things in the archives of Maryland and Virginia.
    Following are a few comments on the children of Jacob and Margaret Snider. This is based on Jane Elsmere’s assumption that the couple at Trinity Lutheran Church in Lancaster PA is indeed our Jacob and Margaret, and therefore, additional children are given not in other circulated listings.


    Children:

    1. Barbara Snider

    , was born about 1753-1754, as she was aged 16, an unmarried person attending communion the first time at Trinity Lutheran Church, Lancaster PA, on the first Sunday after Easter 1770, as Barbara Schneiderin. Jacob Schneider and his wife Margareth were in church that day. Nothing identifies Barbara as their daughter [Trinity Lutheran Church Records, Vol. 2, p. 231].


    2. Jacob Snider

    , was born in 1755, as he was aged 15, an unmarried person attending communion for the first time at Trinity Lutheran Church, Lancaster PA, on the first Sunday after Easter 1770, as Jacob Schneider. Jacob Schneider and his wife Margareth were in church that same day [Trinity Lutheran Church Records, Vol. 2, p. 231].
    Jacob Snider Jr is the most celebrated of the children, or perhaps his descendants are the most dedicated to history. An impressive tombstone in Ritchey Cemetery, Snake Spring Valley, Bedford Co PA reads: “Jacob, son of Jacob Snider, born in Berkeley County, Virginia, came to Hagerstown, Md., and married Catherine, daughter of Abraham Postetter, April 12, 1783, came to Croyle’s Valley, now Snake Spring Valley, in 1785, and located the farm containing the Big Spring and joining the cemetery where he built the Brick House in 1811. He became the 1st Deacon in the 1st Organized Church of the Brethren called Yellow Creek in Providence Country, Cumberland Co., now comprising the counties of Bedford, Fulton, Blair, and parts of Huntingdon and Somerset, and in company with Samuel Ulery, the first elected Minister of this church, visited the membership on extended tours lasting more than three weeks at a time. Traveling a-foot, staff in hand, he was the first teacher of reading and writing in Snake Spring Valley.” The stone, made long after his death, doesn’t seem to have a death date, but he is supposed to have died in 1848 in Bedford Co PA.
    A Church of the Brethren history [cited by Pauline Arnold], contains a traditional account of Jacob Snider’s life – “Jacob Snider, formerly of Berkeley County, Virginia, in 1784 moved from Hagerstown, Maryland into Croyle, the earlier name for Snake Spring Valley. Having been previously chosen, he was the first Deacon located in the original Yellow Creek territory. A few members had preceded him into the valley, and once a year Samuel Ullery from the New Enterprise Section, ordained in 1810 and the first bishop of what was known as the old Yellow Creek congregation, would come over and in company with this deacon, extended the visit to these members and preached some for them. These trips were sometimes taken afoot, and about three weeks time devoted to the work.”
    “This Jacob Snider in 1786 located near the Big Spring on what is now the Snowberger farm. Here he built himself a small shack, the ground for floor, and with his wife and baby, lived until he could build a larger house. In the shack, after he moved, he taught reading, writing and ‘rithmetic, using the German New Testament for his reader. These few months of school gave him the distinction of being the first school teacher in the valley. It is said that in those days he took his grain to Hagerstown, Maryland to have it ground into flour. In 1811 he built the present brick house, size 33 x 33 feet. He brought his workmen from Hagerstown, and made the brick on his farm.”
    “In these early days the home served the purpose of meeting house, and each one at all adapted took regular turn in entertaining the very precious preaching occasion. It was in the spirit and need of these times that in 1811 Jacob Snider erected the large residence still standing on what is known as the Snowberger farm, and located the house so that the water from the Big Spring close by ran through the cellar. The first floor was arranged for living rooms and the second was finished in one large room, 33 x 33 feet, and was used for meeting house. It was in this room that the good old fashioned spiritual meetings were held about which some of the grandfathers tell, and many found Jesus as their Saviour and later emigrating to western states became the founders of churches. Among those who were thus used of the Lord are the names of Snider, Ullery, Snowberger, etc.”
    There are two Bedford Co PA deeds, George and Catharina Weymer to Jacob Snyder, land in Milford Twp., 24 Aug 1792 (Vol. C, p. 633), and Woolerich Bruner to Jacob Snider, 1794 (Vol. D, p. 271-272). I have not pulled these to see if they could be our Jacob Snider Jr.
    Bedford Co PA Deeds (Vol. I, p. 556-558), Jacob Snider Sr and Catharine, his wife, of Providence Twp., Bedford Co, to Jacob Snider Jr of the same, on 10 Jun 1815, in consideration of $1867, 91 acres, 46 perches, on the west side of Tussey’s Mountain, land obtained from John Hendricks by deed dated 28 Apr 1807. Signed, Jacob Snider Senr., and Catharine (her X mark) Snider. Witnesses, Christopher Reiley, Peter White.
    Jacob Snider was administrator of the estate of Francis Smith, dec’d., on 22 Apr 1793. The widow was Mary Smith. Bondsmen were Jacob Studebaker and James Mortimore [Bedford County Archives, by James B. Whisker, Vol. 1, p. 66].
    On 13 May 1816, letters of administration were issued to Jacob Snider and James Heany, executors of Henry Breck (Brecht), Providence Twp., dec’d. Sureties were William Nickum and Jacob Shertzer [Bedford County Archives, by James B. Whisker, Vol. 1, p. 8].
    Jacob Snider first appears on the 1788 tax list for Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, noted with 50 acres, 3 horses, 3 cows, valued at $58. He is not on 1785 and no lists survive for 1786 and 1787, to my knowledge.
    Jacob Snider is listed on the 1790 census for Bedford Co., p. 236, with 1 male over 16, 3 males under 16, and 1 female. Neighbors were Hughey Forgeson and John Gibson.
    Continuing with tax lists, Jacob Snider appears in Providence Twp in 1791. The list itself gives nothing more than the rate that year. A second Jacob Snider appears further down in the “S” section not in our family’s usual neighborhood. Actually, there is a second 1791 tax listing, and this other Jacob Snider has 50 acres, 2 horses, 1 cow, valued at $48, and is listed next to Vallentine [sic] and Henry Hollar. Our Jacob Snider has 50 acres, 3 horses, 3 cows, valued at $64, with neighbors, Hugh Ferguson and John Snider. Margaret Snider, the mother, is not listed anywhere and may still have been in West Virginia. Yet another tax sheet labeled 1791 shows John Snider, David Snider, Jacob Snider, and Jacob Studebaker “side by side” in the “S” section, but that second Jacob Snider on the next page is labeled “Snider Jacob Clearcreek.” A Pennsylvania land warrant #770, for Jacob Snider of Providence Twp., for 100 acres, dated 19 Nov 1796 and returned 7 Mar 1803 for an actual 92.10 acres, patentee Jacob Snider is this other Jacob of Clear Creek according to the survey map (Warrant P48-256, Survey A34-245).
    In 1792 Providence Twp., our Jacob Snider has 50 acres of warrant land, with 3 horses, 2 cows; and the presumed “other” Jacob Snider down the page, has 50 acres warrant land 2 horses, and 1 cow.
    Jacob Snider appears in the 1796 Providence Twp tax list with 100 acres, 20 of those improved, 1 house, 1 barn, 2 horses, and 3 cows, all valued at $364. Neighbors were Simon Stucky [sic] and Frederick Kaiz.
    Jacob Snider paid $1.20 tax in 1797 Providence Twp. His neighbors were Simon Stuckey and Joseph Snider. The other Jacob Snider (.54 cents tax) is identified in this one as “Jacob Snider C. Creek”.
    In 1798, Jacob Snider, again in Providence Twp., paid .50 tax. His neighbors were Simon Stuckey and Joseph Snider.
    The 1798 Providence Twp Direct Tax lists Jacob Snyder with a shingled house 24 x 20, a kitchen 21 x 20 (valued at $90), a barn 48 x 25, and a spring (?) house. He had 118 acres valued at $472, and his neighbors were Hugh Ferguson and Jacob Studebaker. There is a second Jacob Snyder in the Providence Twp 1798 Direct Tax, with 1 cabin 33 x 17, but his neighbor is Francis Ennor (?), and although alphabetical, his placement in the “S” section is on a different page than our Snyder group.
    In 1799 Providence Twp., an alphabetical tax list, a Jacob Snider is listed first in the “S” section with 75 acres and 2 horses, but the one that is ours is listed amongst the other Sniders down the page with 18 acres, 2 horses, and 4 cows.
    The 1800 census for Providence & Colerain Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 407, an alphabetical list, shows Jacob Snyder with 1 male 10-16, 1 male 16-26, 1 male over 45, 1 female 10-16, 2 females 16-26, and 1 female over 45. In the 1800 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), there are again two Jacob Snider’s, the first under Snyder taxed at .30 cents and ours, listed beside Margaret Snider, taxed at .97 cents.
    Jacob Snider paid $3.37 in tax in Providence Twp in 1802 (alphabetical). The second Jacob wasn’t there this time.
    In 1804 Providence Twp taxes (alphabetical), Jacob Snider is shows with 118 acres patent land, valued at $702, plus 2 horses and 4 cows. The other Jacob Snider “C.C.” is back in 1804 with 95 acres warrant land valued at $71, 2 horses, 2 cows. Although an alphabetical listing, there is one Nicholas Snider next to him for the first time, with 50 acres warrant land, valued at $37, 1 horse, 1 cow.
    Jacob Snider appears on the 1805 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), tax paid $2.00. Jacob Snider C.C. (.50 cents) and Nicholas Snider (.20 cents) are again listed.
    In 1806, Jacob Snider is in the Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical) paying $3.00. Jacob C.C. (.50 cents) and Nicholas (.20 cents) are still there.
    Jacob Snider was taxed on two parcels in the 1808 Providence Twp tax roll, 118 acres of patent land, and 90 acres of patent land. He had 3 hores. 3 cows, was a farmer, with a valuation of $897. Jacob Snider CC (95 acres) and Nicholas Snider (50 acres) were there yet too.
    In 1810, Jacob Snider appears in Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 556, with 1 male 16-26, 1 male over 45, 2 females under 10, 2 females 10-16, and 1 female over 45. Neighbors were Wm. Furguson and Adam Botomfield.
    In the 1811 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), Jacob Snider has two parcels, 118 acres and 90 acres, both patented land, 3 horses, 5 cows, andis taxed at $357 value. The other Jacob Snider C.C. and Nicholas are still in the township.
    Jacob Snider has two parcels, 90 acres and 118 acres patent land in 1814, the next surviving Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), with 2 horses, and 4 cows, valued at $188. Jacob Snider CC (Clear Creek) still has the 95 acre tract.
    In 1817, there is a Jacob Snider in Providence Twp with 130 acres, 2 horses, 3 cows, valued at $314; and there is a Jacob Snider in Napier Twp with no land, listed as a waggoneer, property valued at $27.
    In the 1820 census, Jacob Snider is found in Providence Twp., Bedford Co., p. 84, with 1 male over 45, 1 female 10-16, 1 female 16-26, and 1 female over 45. There was 1 agriculturalist. Neighbors were Adam Coons and Isaac Hickman.
    In the 1820 Providence Twp tax list, Jacob Snyder has 118 acres patented land, 3 horses, 4 cows, valued at $592. The Napier Twp Jacob Snider has 160 acres warrant land, 1 horse, 1 cow, worth $119. The Providence Twp man is listed close, but not next to, Nicholas Snyder. There is also a Jacob Snyder Jr in the Snider-Stuckey neighborhood of Providence Twp with 130 acres patented land, 3 horses, 4 cows, valued at $590. A Jacob Snyder is also on the 1820 single freeman list for Providence Twp.
    In the 1823 Providence Twp tax list, Jacob Snider Sen. Has 113 acres patent land, 1 horse, 2 cows, valued at $374. Jacob Snider Junior is listed shortly thereafter followed by Jacob Snider “of Joseph”. The one in Napier Twp that year owns no land.
    A Jacob Snider shows up in Napier Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 96, in 1830, but he is only age 40-50. Perhaps our Jacob Jr was living with family members in his old age, if he was indeed still living at that time – since our evidence of a death date is just tradition.
    Jacob Snider’s children were: John, Jacob, Susanna, Mary, Abraham, David, Elizabeth, Catherine, and Rosanna.


    3. Mary (Snider) Studebaker

    was born 22 Jan 1756, computed from the date on her tombstone – “Mary, wife of Jacob Studebaker, died Nov. 15, 1832 aged 76 yrs., 9 m. & 23 ds.” – cemetery located first drive east of 5666 Studebaker Road in Miami Co OH (personal visit). They married about 1773, judging from the births of the children. “The Studebaker Family in America 1736-1976, by Walter Carlock, Alvin Girard Faust, and E. Irene Miller, p. 153-155, contains a nice section on Jacob and Mary (Snider) Studebaker. Most of the following information is pulled from references mentioned therein.
    Jacob Studebaker, son of Peter and Susannah Studebaker, was born about 1752 in Frederick Co MD (now Washington Co) and died in early 1813, as his will was proved 13 Mar 1813 in Bedford Co PA. Jacob Studinbaker [sic], farmer, of Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA made his will 5 May 1812. He directed his estate, both real and personal, to be sold at public sale with two-thirds to be equally divided amongst his “children, viz., Susan who is intermarried with David Snyder, Catharine who is intermarried with Samuel Stooky, Barbara who is intermarried with Jacob Ritchey, David, Elizabeth who is intermarried with Isaac Kerns, Jacob, John, Abraham, Mary who is intermarried with Hershberger, Hannah who is intermarried with David Buterbaugh, Samuel, Sarah, and Margaret,” after deducting from each what he had already given them. He notes that David had previously received $260 for land in the “Miami Country” and Abraham got a bond for 200 pounds. The interest from one-third of the estate is to support his wife, Mary, then to be divided among the children at her death. If she should remarry, she is to forego this but to receive $500. Wife Mary is named executor. The witnesses were George Espy, Josiah Espy, and David Reiley. It is curious that a stone in the Ritchey or Brethren Cemetery in Snake Spring Valley says that Jacob Studebaker died in 1821, with the stone erected in 1921 by descendants [Bedford County Pennsylvania Cemeteries, Vol. 7, p. 117, by Robetta E. & Thomas C. Imler, 1976].
    One of the earliest mentions of Jacob Studebaker is on a list kept by Col. Stulls, Treasurer for Washington Co MD, dated 24 Dec 1776 – “For so much rec’d from Dunkers and Mennonites for their fines, viz.,” – Jacob Studibaker [sic]. On 8 May 1782, he and others are ordered to pay 5 pounds as a fine to the Committee of Observation in Elizabeth Town district, now Hagerstown MD (Maryland Historical Magazine, v. 12, p. 264). This was near Berkeley Co VA (now WV), and the story is that he moved after this to Bedford Co PA to purchase land as an agent for his father-in-law, Jacob Snider. The source of this tradition is a speech by Samuel Studebaker of Stephenson Co IL made at a 1910 reunion (Genealogical Research Papers of Mrs. Reuben Tiffany).
    We have already mentioned the 10 Feb 1786 Bedford Co deed, Andrew Kennedy of Philadelphia to Jacob Studdybecker, in consideration of 160 pounds, a 222 acre tract called “Forgiveness” on Tussey’s Run in Providence Twp., formerly Cumberland Co PA. Jacob Studdybecker is issued a warrant (No. 263) on 10 Feb 1787 for a tract of 205 acres called “Dalebrook”, 40 perches, in Croyl’s Valley, Providence Twp., Bedford Co (PA Archives, 3rd Series, Vol. 25, p. 626). The survey was made 14 Feb 1787 (Survey Vol. C 210-1, Vol. D 57-143) and the patent was issued 5 Mar 1787 to Jacob Studibecker (Patent Vol. P 8, p. 361). Bedford Co. Deeds, Vol. C, p. 54, Jacob Studeberger and Mary, his wife, sold this 205 acre tract to Jacob Snider of VA on 8 Oct 1787 (aforementioned). Adjoining landowners were Barnard Dougherty, William Henry, George Moore, Henry Donelly, and vacant land.
    Jacob Studybaker also received a warrantee of land, 30 acres, in Bedford Co on 12 Nov 1792 (PA Archives, 5th Series, Vol. 25, p. 628). These images are online now at the Pennsylvania State Archives web site. There is no return date, but it was judged to be 29 acres after the survey (Survey A16-210). This land was along Dunning’s Mountain and bordered John Moore and Jacob Studybaker’s other land.
    Bedford Co Deeds (Vol. E, p. 78), Jacob Studebaker, yeoman, and Mary, his wife, both of Providence Twp., sell to Jacob Snider, yeoman, of the same, in consideration of 150 pounds, 106 ¾ acres, a tract called “Richland,” dated 18 May 1797, being the same land that Studebaker bought of Isaac and Dorothy Bonnett 11 Jun 1796.
    Jacob Snider was administrator of the estate of Francis Smith, dec’d., on 22 Apr 1793. The widow was Mary Smith. Bondsmen were Jacob Studebaker and James Mortimore [Bedford County Archives, by James B. Whisker, Vol. 1, p. 66].
    Jacob Studebaker first appears in the Providence Twp tax lists in 1788, with 300 acres, 4 horses, and 1 cow, valued at $527 – already a wealthy man. Curiously, Jacob Studebaker appears on a 1789 tax list for Providence Twp with 300 acres, 5 horses, 2 cows and “1 Negro”.
    In census records, Jacob Studibecker is found in Bedford Co PA (p. 236) in 1790 with 3 males under 16, 3 males over 16, 6 females, and no slaves. Neighbors were John Moore and Dan McCartney (?).
    Continuing with tax lists, Jacob Studibaker appears in Providence Twp in 1791. The list itself gives nothing more than the rate that year. A second listing shows him with 295 acres, 4 horses, 11 cows, valued at $220. Neighbors were Roberts Orbison and William Cornell. He is listed again – actually is says “Ditto for Studibecker” – with 200 acres, valuation $100. Neighbors were John Murrey and Hugh Ferguson. In 1792 Providence Twp., Jacob Studibaker had 295 acres patent land, 5 horres, and 9 cows. There is also a line drawn over to a checkmark in the indentured servant column.
    In the 1796 tax list for Providence Twp., Jacob Studebaker has 295 acres, 80 acres of that improved, 3 houses, 1 barn, 3 horses, 10 cows, and $2,100 in valuation. His occupation was marked “B. Smith”. Neighbors were a Mr. Scott and John Moore, Esq. In 1797, Jacob Studebaker paid $6.67 in taxes in Providence Twp., but no further information is provided. His neighbors were John Detebough and Daugherty & Stuckey. Jacob Studebaker paid $4.45 tax in 1798 Providence Twp with neighbors John Deavibaugh and John Moore, Esq.
    The 1798 Providence Twp Direct Tax lists Jacob Studybaker with an old cabin 16 x 14, valued at $10, a small cabin 16 x 14, valued at $6, a barn of squared logs 24 x 31 and a stable. He had a 295 acres tract valued at $1770 and a 290 acre tract valued at $1430. His listed neighbors were John Moore and Jacob Bennet.
    In 1799, Jacob Studebaker appears in the alphabetical Providence Twp tax list with 275 acres, 4 horses, and 11 cows. In the next column for Grist & Saw Mills, is written “1 stud do,” so I assume the ditto refers to a previous column and Studebaker probably owned a stud horse. I cannot read anything about mills in that abbreviation.
    The 1800 census for Providence and Colerain Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 407, an alphabetical listing, shows Jacob Studibaker with 2 males under 10, 1 male 10-16, 2 males 16-26, 1 male over 45, 2 females under 10, 1 female 10-16, 1 female 16-26, and 1 female over 45. Jacob Studebaker paid $2.93 in the 1800 Providence Twp tax list, an alphabetical listing, and $1.58 for unseated lands. There is also a listing under James Taylor that he paid .27 cents tax for Studebaker.
    Jacob Studebaker paid $8.36 in tax in Providence Twp in 1802 (alphabetical).
    Jacob Studybaker [sic] is again listed in 1804 Providence Twp taxes, with 300 acres patent land, valued at $1800; 200 acres warrant land valued at $800; 50 acres warrant land valued at $200 (labeled “for Rich” – perhaps ridge?); 30 acres patent land, valued at $15 (labeled “for mountain land”), plus 6 horses, and 8 cows. His total valuation was $3073, by far the richest man on the three pages I photocopied.
    Jacob Studibaker appears on the 1805 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), tax paid $8.59.
    In 1806, Jacob Studebaker is again taxed in Providence Twp (alphabetical) for $7.69.
    Jacob Studibaker Senr. is listed as such in the 1808 Providence Twp tax roll (alphabetical) because another Jacob Studibaker appears. The older man had 295 acres patent land, 30 acres warrant land, 1 distillery, 4 horses, 6 cows, was a farmer, with a valuation of $2096. I guess we now know how Studebaker made his money! Actually, grain was processed into alcohol in those days, because this was cheaper to haul over the mountains to market. It was a profitable occupation.
    The 1810 census for Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 555, shows Jacob Studybaker with 1 male 10-16, 1 male 16-26, 1 male over 45, 2 males under 10, and 1 female 26-45. Neighbors were David Studybaker and Saml. Mowry.
    In the 1811 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), Jacob Studebaker is listed with 300 acres patented land, 29 acres warranted land, 6 horses, 8 cows, with a valuation of $782.
    In the next surviving Providence Twp tax list for 1814 (alphabetical), it is apparent that Jacob Studebkaer has died. The listing is for Mary Studibaker, 300 acres patent land, 1 tan yard, 2 horses, and 3 cows, valued at $1893.
    I cannot seem to find Mary (Snider) Studebaker in 1820, alone or amongst her children in an age category that would fit.
    According to some pages sent by researcher Pauline Arnold in 1980, a History of the Church of the Brethren contains the line, “Jacob Studebaker, married to Mary, daughter of Jacob Snider, built in 1803 the large stone house on the farm now owned by Elias Baker. In the bake-oven house, still standing on this place, the first Love Feast in the valley was held.”
    I’m going to quote two full paragraphs from the Studebaker book (p. 153) to give some insight into the personal live of Mary and Jacob Studebaker. These stories no doubt were related at the 1910 reunion by the speaker Samuel Studebaker:
    “In 1811, Jacob and Mary Studebaker came on horseback from PA to Stark Co OH to pay their daughter, Catherine Stuckey, a visit. On this memorable trip, the soldiers of the War of 1812 overtook them and begged for their horses. When they found that they could not get them by using persuasive measures they attempted to take them by force. Their own horses were scrawny and poor indeed while Jacob’s were sleek and fat. However, both Jacob and Mary gave the horses the whip and away they went like the wind. The soldiers were unable to follow on account of the weakened condition of their steeds. They remained a week with their daughter and then returned to PA without any further incident.” [Note: War of 1812 solders were most active in Ohio 1813-14, definitely not in 1811].
    “Jacob was a man of great influence and did a great deal of preaching, serving his day and generation well. He built a huge bake oven house, in which the first “love feast” of Snake Spring Valley, PA was held. Having first lived in a log cabin, in 1803 he built a large stone house which stood until 1897. The upstairs was especially arranged and built for the purpose of preaching and love feasts. He also built a large barn (45 x 80 ft) which was burned down by lightning, and another was built on the foundation of the first. On the doors opening to the barn floor were strap hinges 3 feet long which had been made in his own blacksmith shop. One of the doors of the early buildings was still in use in 1910 and had a number of bullet holes shot in it by Indians. A pear tree bearing fruit in1910 and still standing on the homestead was over two feet in diameter. It could well have been planted by Jacob Studebaker.”
    Mary (Snider) Studebaker did not remarry but removed with her children to Miami Co OH. Her tombstone survives in the Studebaker Cemetery in Sect. 22, Bethel Twp., between Rudy and Pisgah roads. “Miami County Cemetery Records 1962-1963,” by Elise H. Lindenberger, p. 231, lists it as “Studebaker, Mary, wife of Jacob; died Nov. 15, 1832; 76 years; born 1756.” Abraham Studebaker, the son mentioned in Jacob’s will, had received an entry for 160 2/4 acres in the SE ¼, Sect. 31, Twp. 8, Range 5, on 20 Aug 1805 (No. 1094 – “Land Patent Records, Miami County, Ohio,” by Anita Short and Ruth Bowers, p. 34). I don’t spot a land grant for David Studebaker, mentioned with “Miami Country” land in will, but the county deeds don’t seem to survive until 1807. There is a power of attorney on file in Miami Co OH, 21 Aug 1809, Jacob Studebaker to John Miller (Deeds, Vol. 2, p. 331).


    4. Susanna Snider

    , m. John Overholser
    In 1810, they migrated to Montgomery Co OH, according to family sources; however, John and Abraham Overholser are taxed in Montgomery Co for the year 1809. They are in Madison Twp.
    On the 1814 resident proprietors list for Montgomery Co OH, John Overholser is listed with land in Range 5, Twp. 4, Sect. 30, originally patented to Jacob Stutzman. One Barbara Overholser owned land in Sect. 27 at this time. This is Jefferson Twp.
    John Overholser was a purchaser at the Montgomery Co estates sale of his brother-in-law William Snider on 26 Jan 1818 [Montgomery Co Common Pleas, Probate Docket C-1, p. 167].
    The 1820 census for Montgomery Co OH does not appear to survive.
    In July Term 1820, Montgomery Co OH, John Overholser is security for the guardianship of Rosanna Bennet, age 15, heir of Thomas Bennet, deceased, who chose Jacob Overholser as her guardian [Montgomery Co Common Pleas, Probate Docket D-1, p. 234].
    John Overholser is listed in the 1830 census for Madison Twp., Montgomery Co OH, p. 261, with 1 male 15-20, 1 male 60-70, 1 female 15-20, and 1 female 60-70. Neighbors were John Wagaman and Jacob Shivley.
    In 1840, John Overholser is in Madison Twp., Montgomery Co OH, p. 154, with 1 male 5-10, 1 male 70-80, 1 female 30-40, and 1 female 70-80. Neighbors were Jeremiah Johns and Daniel Overholser.
    John Overholser left a will in Montgomery Co (Will Book D, p. 40; Probate Docket A1, p. 129). I do not have a copy of this.
    The children of Susannah (Snider) Overholser were Abraham, Jacob, Barbara, Margaret, Susanna, Mary, Samuel, Elizabeth, Absalom, Daniel, Hannah, Henry, and John.


    [ ---, m. James Mortimer? ]

    We initially did not have a first name for this Snider daughter if this is indeed the case. In the list of final settlement heirs of Jacob Snider, this James Mortimer’s amount was blank. I personally now do not think he is a son-in-law. I’m not giving this child a number but am leaving the information in my report since he has appeared in most published lists of Jacob Snider’s heirs.
    The History of Bedford and Somerset Co PA, by Waterman, p. 106, states that John and James Mortimore Jr., were fined after a 1795 trial as participants in the Whiskey Insurrection. Then on p. 272, “The Mortimores are the descendants of one of the earliest settlers. James Mortimore was an Irishman, who located in Snake Spring valley and followed surveying. John, David, Joseph, George and James were his sons, and Jane (Evans), Elizabeth (Armstrong) and Isabel his daughters, all dead. John Mortimore, who died in 1863, was born in Snake Spring valley in 1786.”
    James Mortimore and Jacob Studebaker were bondsmen in the estate of Francis Smith, dec’d., on 22 Apr 1793. Jacob Snider was the administrator. The widow was Mary Smith [Bedford County Archives, by James B. Whisker, Vol. 1, p. 66].
    If Mortimer is indeed part of the Snider family, he seems to be in Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA the earliest. John and James Mortimore are side by side on the 1780 tax list. James has no land, but is taxed for two horses. He should have been at least age 21 by this time. (He wasn’t on the 1779 tax list although John was). James Mortimor [sic] is a single freeman in 1781 and 1782 and 1783. He was noted with 1 horse in the 1783 list. By 1785, he appears in the regular tax list (perhaps has married), still has no land, but owns two cows. Snider and Studebaker had not shown up in the tax lists yet at this point. In the next available Providence Twp tax lists, 1788, James Mortimer has 200 acres, 1 horse, and 2 cows, with a value of $132.
    James Mortemere [sic] is listed in the 1790 census for Bedford Co PA, p. 236, with 1 male over 16, 4 males under 16, and 1 female. Neighbors were John Mortemere and John Hendricks.
    Continuing with the 1791 Providence Twp tax list, James Mortimore is a taxpayer that year. He has 150 acres, 2 horses, 3 cows, valued at $104. Neighbors were William Cornell and John Mortimore Jr. In 1792, James Mortimore has 344 acres of warrant land, 2 horses, and 2 cows.
    The next Providence Twp tax list, for 1796, shows James Mortimore with 150 acres, 1 dwelling house, 1 horse, 2 cows, occupation surveyor, valued at $200. Neighbors were Hugh Ferguson and Frederick Hill. James Mortimer is one of the three tax appraisers for the township in 1796. James Mortimer also appears on the 1797 Providence Twp tax list, but nothing more than the tax paid is given ($1.00). His neighbors were Joseph Ferguson and Swift’s land. The 1798 Providence Twp tax list shows James Mortimore .47 cents paid with neighbors Joseph Ferguson and Swift’s land.
    The 1798 Direct Tax for Providence Twp shows James Mortimer with no house of his own, but he had 150 acres valued at $75. His neighbor was John Ferguson.
    We are back to an alphabetical tax list for 1799, and James Mortimer is shown in Providence Twp., this time with no land, but 1 horse and 2 cows.
    In 1800, James Mortimore is found in Providence & Colerain Twp., Bedford Co., p. 405, with 2 males under 10, 3 males 10-16, 1 male over 45, 3 females under 10, and 1 female 26-45. This is an alphabetical listing. James Mortimore is taxed in Providence Twp in 1800, paying .08 cents and another .16 cents on unseated land. This is an alphabetical list, so neighbors cannot be determined.
    James Mortimore paid .90 cents in tax in Providence Twp in 1802 (alphabetical).
    James Mortimore is again listed in 1804 Providence Twp taxes, with 150 acres warrant land, valued at $75, and 2 horses (alphabetical).
    James Mortimer appears on the 1805 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), tax paid .30 cents.
    In 1806, James Mortimer is again taxed in Providence Twp (alphabetical) for just .30 cents. David Mortimer appears on the single freeman tax list that year, the first adult grandchild of Jacob and Margaret Snider that shows up in these lists. This, by definition, puts the Mortimer mother’s birth back into the 1760s if she is indeed a Snider.
    The tax list for 1808 Providence Twp does not show a James Mortimer. He is likely dead. It does list Elizabeth Mortimore with 150 acres warrant land, 1 horse, and 1 cow. Her occupation is farmer, valuation $326. Since my ancestor is Elizabeth (Snider) Henricks, and she was still alive in Ohio at this time, there cannot be two named Elizabeth in the same family group, and therefore the blank amount by James Mortimer’s name in the Jacob Snider estate settlement was there for a reason. He is probably not an heir. Perhaps he was serving as an appraiser and was being paid. Of course, there is always a possibility that this Elizabeth was a second wife and he indeed was married to one of Jacob Snider’s daughters. Any early Mortimer deeds of sale need to be checked.
    In the 1810 Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA census, p. 556, there is a listing for a Widow Mortimer. She has 1 male 10-16, 1 male 16-26, 2 females 10-16, and 1 female over 45. Her neighbor was the Widow Ferguson.
    Elizabeth Mortimore is again taxed in the 1811 alphabetical Providence Twp list with 100 acres warrant land, 1 horse, 2 cows, valued at $127.


    5. John Snider

    of Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA made his will 17 Jun 1793, naming his wife Susanna and several minor children – “My well beloved children David, Catherena, Jacob, Abraham, and John”. The phrase “real and personal” estate appears in the document, but no land is specifically identified. Executors were Jacob Snider and John Hendriks [sic]. Witnesses, Jacob Fletcher and Jacob Studebaker. Signed John (his X mark) Snider. The witnesses affirmed the will in court 20 Aug 1793 indicating that Snider had died. Baltser Hess was also named a witness at that time. The will was not recorded until 23 Jul 1956 [sic] along with several other wills they had located in the courthouse [Bedford Co Wills, Vol. ??, p. 285].
    Jno. Snider is noted on the 1788 tax list for Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, with 200 acres, 1 horse, 2 cows, valued at $116. John Snider is listed in the 1790 Bedford Co PA census, p. 236, with 1 male over 16, 2 males under 16, and 2 females. Neighbors were John Hendricks and Hughey Forgeson.
    John Snider was supposed to have married Susanna Oberholser, but I have not seen the evidence for this.
    There was a younger John Snider, a miller, in Woodbury Twp, Bedford Co., with a stone mill still standing near Loysburg the last that I knew. Some family members thought that this gentleman was a son of our John Snider, and it may be true, as the 1789 tax list for Woodberry [sic] Twp shows John Snyder, tax value $351, 950 acres, 3 horses, 8 cows; and right next door, Abram Overholtzer, saw mill, value $149, with 220 acres, 3 horses, and 3 cows. Although the will above says “of Providence,” there was no John Snider taxed there in 1789.
    Continuing with tax lists, John Snider appears back in Providence Twp in 1791. He has 100 acres, 2 horses, 2 cows, valued at $76, with neighbors Jacob Snider and David Snider. In 1792 in Providence Twp., John Snider had 100 acres of warrant land, with 2 horses, and 2 cows.
    The Providence and Woodbury men could be the same man if taxed for land owned in both townships, but they easily could be different pioneers with the same name. If so, the Overholser maiden name for the wife could be in question, because that seems to have been associated with Woodbury Twp.
    A John Snider pops up in 1808 Providence Twp amongst the family. He has no land, but has 1 horse, 2 cows, valued at $62, and is a farmer. This is probably an older grandchild of Jacob and Margaret Snider. He continues to live alongside the family in succeeding tax lists.


    6. Elizabeth (Snider) Henricks

    , widow of John Henricks of Madison Twp., Perry Co OH, made her will 2 Feb 1826 [Vol. 1, p. 349-350] which was offered for probate 27 Mar 1826. Micel Foght [sic] and Robert Wiley were executors, and Elijah Scofield and James Ward were witnesses. She asks for decent burial, funeral charges paid, and all estate sold with the money divided amongst her children: “Jacob, Marget [sic], John, George, Samuel, Daniel, Peter, Elijah, Elizabeth.” A piece of her tombstone survives in the Mount Perry Cemetery along Jonathan Creek – “Eliz ---- the w --- Henricks ---- 5, 1826.” I believe that she died on 5 Mar 1826. The caretaker told me that it once stood about four rows up the center from the front of the cemetery. This was formerly called the Dunker Cemetery or Jonathan Creek Cemetery. Unfortunately, the age is not on this piece so we do not have a birth date for her. Her first child, Jacob Henricks, was born 15 Jan 1788, so Elizabeth was likely born about 1770 or earlier.
    Her husband was John Henricks or Hendricks. No marriage date or place has been identified. The will of John Henricks of Madison Twp., then Muskingum Co OH (Perry Co was formed in 1818), is dated 18 Mar 1816. The document is in English and he signed his own name. Witnesses were James Ward and John Scofield. Mr. Henricks orders that “Jacob John & George Hanricks [sic] my three Eldest Sons” be executors and insure him a decent Christian burial. He gives his widow Elizabeth land in the NE quarter Sect. 18, Twp. 17, Range 15, along with 1/3rd of his personal estate including “my riding horse called Jack.” The other personal goods were to be sold at a “Publick Sale to the best bidder one year After My Deceise.” The profits of this event were to be divided among his children: “Jacob Peggy John George Samuel Joseph Daniel Peter Elija Elizebeth Mary.” The tombstone for John Henricks has not been found but it is assumed that he died in the Spring of 1816 probably in the village of Mount Perry. The order of the children listed in the two wills is identical, but Joseph and Mary are omitted in John’s will and may have predeceased their father.
    The case packet [#182] for the John Henricks estate survives in Muskingum Co Court of Common Pleas. An inventory was taken 22 Jun 1816 by appraisers, William Mitchell, John Eby, and Edward Ward. Livestock is extensive and includes such things as 16 small pigs, 9 young hogs, 20 sheep, 1 young bull, 5 large cows described by color, 5 young cattle, 1 bay mare, 1 black mare, 1 gray horse, 1 old horse, 1 sorrel colt, etc. John Henricks operated a sawmill and a gristmill on Jonathan’s Creek and there are indications of this in the inventory – 1 pile walnut plank, milled hemp, hemp not milled, 50 walnut planks, smith tools, the undivided half of 3767 feet of oak plank, 6 mill saw files, 1 pair millstones, sundry boards cherry & walnut, 2 tomahawks, 1 grindstone, and much more – 4 lengthy pages of belongings. Homestead items included 7 bedsteads and bedding, suggesting the size of the house. The total value was $1349.19 with $179.27 in debts. Several “accounts on book” were mentioned indicating again an active business enterprise. The vendue or estate sale was held 8 and 9 Apr 1817 and is an even more extensive list of personal property sold. Foremost among these were a Bible and 17 books, a large collection for that day and age. Hopefully, it is a family Bible, yet to be found.
    Ohio Eagle (Lancaster), 10 Nov 1825: “For sale – a valuable farm, about 260 acres of land, late the estate of John Hendricks, dec’d., situate on Jonathan’s Creek.” A grist mill with two pair of stones and a saw mill are described. The tract is sold, per Perry Co Deeds, Vol. C, p. 187-188, Jacob Henricks and wife Elizabeth, Solomon Hufford and wife Margaret, John Henricks and wife Mary, George Henricks and wife Elizabeth, Daniel Henricks and wife Sarah, Peter Henricks, Eli Henricks, Samuel Olinger and wife Elizabeth, all “children and heirs at law of John Henricks late of Madison Township in the county of Muskingum now Perry”, for $4000, to Samuel Henricks, also one of the heirs at law, the N ½ of Sect. 18, Twp. 17, Range 15, being 81 acres, more or less. The deed was dated 1 Aug 1827 and all heirs sign. Witnesses were Thomas Nisbet, James Snider, Ellison Martin, and John Larimer. In a similar deed [Perry Co Deeds, Vol. C, p. 194], the heirs sell the S ½ of the NE ¼ of Sect. 18, to Jacob Henricks, one of the heirs, in consideration of $400, 81 acres, dated 31 Mar 1827. Witnesses were Thomas Nisbet and Albert Wiley.
    The History of Fairfield and Perry Counties, p. 426, states that “…John Henricks, was a native of Germany, and emigrated to America shortly after the Revolutionary War, and settled in Bedford Co., Pa., …” However, descendant Jane Elsmere suggests a ca. 1765 birth for John Henricks in New Britain Twp., Bucks Co PA and identifies his father as Jacob Hen(d)ricks. Her article was published under the title, “John Henricks: his Ancestry, Life and Children” in Brethren Roots, Vol. 32, No. 2, Summer 2000. This is expanded in her book, Shaffer-Rudy Family History, aforementioned.
    I have not located evidence of John Henricks in Berkeley Co VA, home of the Jacob Snider family, other than the listing in the final settlement of Jacob’s estate, and John was certainly in Pennsylvania at that time [1806]; however, Christine Bergen, an early Berkeley Co genealogist, apparently located something with the name John Hendrickson in Berkeley Co that has not surfaced. She lists the name in her letters regarding Jacob Snider’s family. Emmert F. Bittinger, an authority on the Brethren, believes that our John Hendricks is the one, who with another Brethren, Thomas Gilbert, witness the will of Brethren John Arnold 25 Aug 1785 in Burkittsville, Frederick Co MD. This area is close to Berkeley Co WV [“A Brother Named Albertus – A Brethren Hendricks Family,” in Mennonite Family History, Apr 2001, p. 122-125].
    In 1790 Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 236, John Hendricks is listed with neighbors, James Mortemore and John Snider. He is recorded with 1 male over 16, 1 male under 16, and 2 females.
    John Hendricks appears in the 1791 Providence Twp tax list with 100 acres, 2 horses, 3 cows, valued at $79. Neighbors were David Snider and William Hartley. A second list, labeled 1791, uses the Hendrix spelling of the surname. In the 1792 Providence Twp tax list, John Hendricks had 100 acres patent land, 3 horses, and 3 cows.
    John Hendriks [sic] is listed as a witness in the Bedford Co PA will of John Snider, made 17 Jan 1793.
    On 18 Nov 1794, John Hendrickson is administrator of Jacob Keagy, deceased, of Bedford Co. Bond was issued by Peter Markley, John Fike, and Ebeneazer Gryfub. Because of the Hendricks-Markley connection in Brothers Valley, this John may not be ours [Bedford County Archives, Vol. 1, p. 66, by James B. Whisker].
    On 14 Jun 1796, John Hendrick acted as executor of his “friend” Frederick Traig’s will in Providence Twp., Bedford Co., along with Traig’s son, David [Pennsylvania Genealogical Society Magazine, vol. 10, p. 167].
    John Hendricks is also taxed in Providence Twp in 1796 for 90 acres, 78 of those improved, 1 house, 1 barn, 2 horses, 3 cows, all valued at $270. Neighbors were Mr. Ferguson and Margret Snider, Widow.
    On 6 Sep 1796, Margret Snider of Providence Twp, widow, deeded part (91 acres) of three tracts, Partnership, Union, and Plainfield to John Hendricks of Providence Twp. This was mentioned previously. This was sold to Jacob Snider 28 Apr 1807.
    John Hendricks paid $1.20 in taxes in 1797 Providence Twp. His neighbors were John Ferguson and Margaret Snider, widow.
    In 1798, John Hendricks paid .81 cents tax in Providence Twp with neighbors listed as John Ferguson and Margret Snider, Widow.
    The 1798 Direct Tax for Providence Twp includes Jno. Hendricks with 1 house measuring 20 x 17 valued at $60; also a barn. Margret Snyder was listed as his neighbor. Hendricks was taxed for 90 acres with value $315.
    In 1799, John Henricks is listed alphabetically in Providence Twp with 90 acres, 2 horses, and 3 cows.
    In the 1800 census for Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, John Hendricks was listed with 1 male 25-45, 1 male 10-16, 5 males under 10, 1 female 25-45, and 1 female under 10. The listing is alphabetical, so the neighbors cannot be determined. John Hendricks appears also in the 1800 alphabetical tax list for Providence Twp, taxed at .76 cents.
    John Hendricks paid $2.64 in tax in Providence Twp in 1802 (alphabetical).
    John Hendricks is again listed in 1804 Providence Twp with 90 acres of patent land, valued at $540, with 2 horses and 3 cows (alphabetical).
    On 8 Jun 1805, John Henricks was a witness to the Providence Twp will of Hugh Ferguson [Pennsylvania Genealogical Society Magazine, v. 11, p. 171]. John Hendrickson appears on the 1805 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), tax paid $1.11.
    There are three Ohio land grants for John Hendricks in the Ohio River Survey for Madison Twp (Range 15, Twp 17), Perry Co., Vol. 2, p. 119 – the N ½ Sect. 17, 320 acres, on 20 Sep 1805; the NE ¼ Sect. 18, 160 acres, on 15 Oct 1806; and the SE ¼ Sect. 18, 160 acres, on 18 Mar 1813. Hendricks was a resident of Bedford Co PA when the first two land entries were made. He does not appear on the 1806 Providence Twp tax list.
    The History of Fairfield and Perry Counties, Ohio, p. 426, states that John Henricks “… in 1809, moved with his son, George, to Ohio and settled in Perry Co., where he built the first grist mill on Jonathan’s Creek.” The Commemorative Biographical Record of Sandusky Co., Ohio, adds that “Jacob Henricks, who was born in Pennsylvania, moved with his parents, in 1807, to Perry county, Ohio …” A Biographical Record of Fairfield County, Ohio, p. 63, in an article concerning Margaret (Henricks) Hufford – by mistake called Rebecca – states that “she came to Ohio with her father who entered land on Jonathan’s creek in Perry county, where he built one of the first flouring mills in the state and there he spent his remaining days and was actively connected with early industrial interests.” Marzolff’s History of Perry County, Ohio, p. 88, reports that “In 1828, Mt. Perry was platted. But Hendrick’s Mill around which the town grew was built in 1820.”
    I tried to find said mill in the 1820 manufacturer’s schedule for Madison Twp., Perry Co OH, but the census taker did not identify the owners, and I found 4 sawmills and 2 gristmills inventoried. There was also one business that had “one thousand feet” of “walnut and cherry plank” and “one set of cabinet tools.” That sounds close to the amount and type of wood in the 1816 estate inventory [NARA film, Perry Co., p. 919, 922-927].
    A Muskingum Co OH deed (Vol. E, p. 261-262) might be mentioned. It is dated 20 Aug 1816 shortly after the death of John Henricks. William and Ann McClure, of Madison Twp., Muskingum Co., in consideration of $483, sell to James, John, and George Henricks, of the same township, 40 acres in Sect. 8, Twp. 17 (Madison Twp). Witnesses were Thomas Nesbit and Samuel Burn.
    John Henricks’ name has not been found on the rolls of the German-Baptist church, however, his daughter Margaret Hufford does appear on the “incomplete” list of the founding members of Rush Creek (Bremen) Brethren church in 1809 and several of John’s children were married under their auspices. John was the grandfather of three Brethren ministers, and in fact, the History of the Church of the Brethren – Southern Ohio District, p. 151, mentions John Hendricks, a “pioneer preacher” of the Rush Creek congregation. Daniel Snider, a brother of Elizabeth Henricks, often visited the Bremen church to preach. The Jonathan Creek Brethren church, located on the site of the present Methodist church in Mount Perry, where Elder Daniel Snider and Rev. Elijah Schofield ministered, was not organized until 1817 [A History of the Church of the Brethren, Northeastern Ohio, 1914, p. 49-54].
    The census for 1810 in Ohio does not survive, but on 13 Feb 1810, John Hendricks was the executor of the will of George Olinger of Madison Twp., Muskingum Co., while John’s son, Jacob Henricks [sic], witnessed the same document [Muskingum Co OH Wills, Vol. A, p. 137-139].
    With some imagination, one can possibly make out the name John Hainrick on the 1811 Fairfield Co OH tax list with 100 acres. John Henricks is on the 1813 Muskingum Co OH tax list with three 160 acre tracts in Range 15, Twp. 17, Sections 17 and 18. He is listed as the original proprietor. In 1816, the name is spelled John Hendrix on the Muskingum Co tax list [Early Ohio Tax Records, p. 289].
    Elizabeth Hendrix appears in the 1820 census for Madison Twp., Perry Co OH, p,. 2, with 1 male over 45, 3 males 16-26 (one of these being 16-18), 1 male 10-16, 1 female over 45, and 2 females 10-16. Her sons, John, Samuel, George and Jacob Hendrix are all listed on pages 2 and 3, Madison Twp. I don’t know the identity of the older male in the household.


    7. David Snider

    , m. Susanna Studebaker
    David Snider appears in the 1787 personal property tax list for Berkeley Co VA, although Jacob Snider was charged with the tax [Schreiner-Yantis, The 1787 Census of Virginia, Vol. 2, p. 1416]. This would mean that David was at least age 21, born in 1766 or probably a bit earlier.
    David Snider is in the 1791 Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA tax list, with 100 acres, valued at $50. Neighbors were John Snider and John Hendricks. In 1792 Providence Twp., David Snider was taxed for 100 acres of patent land, with no horses or cows. In the 1796 Providence Twp tax list, David Snider has 91 acres, 14 improved, 1 dwelling, 1 barn 2 horses, and 2 cows. His neighbor is Peter Hendericks [sic]. David Snider paid $1.07 in the 1797 Providence Twp tax list. His neighbors were Frances Richey and Peter Hendericks. In 1798 Providence Twp., David Snider is taxed .72 cents. His neighbors again are Francis Richey and Peter Hendricks.
    David Snyder does appear on the 1798 Direct Tax for Providence Twp (p. 50), with land valued at $300. In the “B” list, his cabin is 18 x 16, valued at $30, with a barn 48 x 18. His neighbor is Francis Ritchy. Snyder has 100 acres valued at $300.
    In 1799, David Snider’s name is in the alphabetical Providence Twp tax list with 80 acres, 1 horse, and 2 cows.
    David Snyder appears in the 1800 census for Providence & Colerain Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 407, with 2 males under 10, 1 male 26-45, 2 females under 10, and 1 female 26-45. This is an alphabetical listing. David Snider paid .64 cents in the 1800 Providence Twp tax list, an alphabetical listing.
    David Snider paid $2.22 in tax in Providence Twp in 1802 (alphabetical).
    In 1804 Providence Twp., David Snider is taxed for 93 acres patent land, valued at $372, with 2 horses and 3 cows.
    David Snider appears on the 1805 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), tax paid $1.14.
    In 1806, David Snider is in the Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical) again paying $1.14.
    David Snider is in Providence Twp in 1808 and was taxed for 100 acres patent land, 2 horses, and 4 cows. His occupation was farmer and the valuation was $591.
    David Snider is in Providence Twp., Bedford Co, p. 556, in 1810, with 2 males under 10, 2 males 10-16, 1 male over 45, 2 females under 10, and 1 female over 45. Neighbors were Peter Carnes and Wm. Nichan.
    In the 1811 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), David Snider has 81 acres patented land, and 2 cows, valued at $133.
    David Snider has 100 acres patent land in 1814, the next surviving Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), with 2 horses, and 2 cows, valued at $342.
    The Studebaker genealogy mentions that David Snider moved to Delaware Co IN, but no further data is provided. I checked several books, court records, and census records for that county, but do not seem to spot him in 1820.
    There is a David Snyder in Palmyra Twp., Knox Co IN in 1820 [p. 88A], but he shows up in a November Term 1810 suit, David Snyder vs. Robert Adams, over a debt, some four years before the last mention of our David Snider in Bedford Co PA. Plus an 1820 deed gives this David’s wife as Elizabeth (Knox Co IN Deeds, Vol. C, p. 31). This David Snyder was one of the securities in the 1823 administration of Wm. Snyder, deceased; Susannah Snyder, administrator (Knox Co IN Probate, 6 Jun 1822 court, 8 Mar 1823 court, Mar Term 1827 court). Susan Snyder was head of household next to David Snyder in Knox Co in the 1830 census [p. 267]. The names are interesting but I don’t think this can work. There is a Henry Snyder next door.
    There is also a David Snider Jr [sic] in Jefferson Twp., Montgomery Co OH on the 1814 resident proprietors list, but he is accompanied by a Daniel Snider Jr and a Henry Snider, so it is doubtful that this is our group. This David Snider was at the estate sale of Abraham Hilderbrand of Montgomery Co on 14 Nov 1815, and attended another sale in 1817 [Early Settlers of Montgomery Co OH, by Shirley Mikesell, Vol. 1, p. 161; Vol. 2, p. 165, 183]. A brother, William Snider, and a brother-in-law, John Overholser, were in Montgomery Co by this time, the latter in Jefferson Twp.
    There is a David Snyder who shows up in the 1820 census for Barnesville, Belmont Co OH, p. 270, with 1 male over 45, 1 female 26-45, 1 female over 45, and 1 person in manufacturing. Neighbors were Thomas Wier and Arthur Warton. Belmont Co OH deed records show that David Snyder and Margaret, his wife, of Belmont Co, in consideration of $600, sell the SW ¼ Sect. 36, Twp. 7, Range 5, Steubenville District, to Avery West of Belmont Co on 12 Dec 1817 [Deeds, Vol. G, p. 143]. However, this land was originally patent to Stephen Pryan 30 Jan 1809 who conveyed it to one Peter Snyder, who conveyed it to David Snyder. Again, this must be a different David Snyder living in Belmont Co OH, where our David’s brother George resided.
    Perhaps other researchers have learned what happened to David Snider when he left Bedford Co and have some documentation in regard to his wife. He doesn’t seem to show up in the Delaware Co IN census, but perhaps he didn’t live long once he got there.


    8. Hannah Snider

    , is believed to have been born in 1768 in Virginia according to Jeff Gray, a descendant of her daughter Rosannah Myers. She died in the 1840’s, judging from her absence in the 1850 census. The same gentleman noted a 1788 marriage date to Jacob Riner, son of Henry and Elizabeth Riner. Jacob Riner was born ca. 1767 VA, according to the 1850 census, and died between 12 Jun and Aug 1858 (date and probate of Berkeley Co VA will). Jacob Riner is believed to be the son of Henry Riner, originally a Lutheran, from Limerick Twp, Philadelphia Co (now Montgomery Co) PA.
    This couple is certainly buried in Riner’s Graveyard on Oak Grove Road in Jones Springs. Many of the old markers have no inscriptions and not one inscribed Riner marker survives.
    Virginia did not have a 1790 and 1800 census that survived.
    I could not locate Jacob Riner on the 1798 House and Slave tax for Berkeley Co VA although his father, Henry Riner, was there.
    In 1810, there is a Jacob Rain or Rainer noted on p. 587, with 1 male under 10, 2 males 10-16, 1 male 26-45, 1 male over 45, 2 females under 10, 1 female 10-16, 1 female 16-26, and 1 female 26-45. Jacob was first on that particular list and his one neighbor was Richd. McMech. I do note that Henry Riner, Adam Riner, and John Rainey are all on p. 557, and a later neighbor, John Shimp is in p. 569, so the above gentleman may not be our man.
    In the 1820 census for Middletown, Berkeley Co VA, p. 87, Jacob Riner is noted with 2 males under 10, 1 male 16-26, 1 male 26-45, 1 male over 45, 1 female under 10, 5 females 10-16, 3 females 16-26, 1 female over 45, and 3 agriculturalists. This was the first name noted in the neighborhood, but next door was John Shimp. Henry Riner was 5 houses away and James Rainey was on the same page.
    In 1830, Berkeley Co VA, p. 241 (alphabetical list), Jacob Riner is listed with 1 male 5-10, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 50-60, 1 female 10-15, 1 female 15-20, 1 female 20-30, and 1 female 50-60. Henry Roney, Michael Roney, Henry Riner Senr., and Henry Riner, Junr., were all nearby.
    The 1840 census for Berkeley Co VA, p. 134, shows Jacob Riner, Sr., with 1 male 15-20, 1 male 70-80, 1 female 20-30, and 1 female 70-80. Neighbors were Jonas Shimp and Jacob Riner, Jr.
    In 1850, p. 404, Berkeley Co VA, Hannah (Snider) Riner has apparently died, and Jacob Riner, age 83 VA, no occupation, is living with his daughter, Rosan [sic] Myers and her husband, Archibald Myers. Neighbors were William Moore and Daniel Keys.
    Jacob Riner’s will appears in Berkeley Co Re-Recorded Deed Book 2, p. 340:
    “In the name of God, Amen. I Jacob Riner of the County of Berkeley and State of Virginia, this 12th day of June in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred fifty eight make this my last will and testament revoking all others heretofore made. I do hereby give and bequeath unto my son in law Archabald Myers and his wife Rosannah Myers six hundred dollars out of my real or personal estate, as a compensation for keeping me boarded and waiting on me for twelve years past in old age and affliction believing they have fully earned the same. I further direct that my executor shall sell the land I own either privately or publicly to the best advantage, and after having paid all my debts including the above six hundred dollars, I desire that each one of my children hereafter named shall have an equal share of my remaining estate should there by any. Namely, Catherine Eslinger or heirs shall have one tenth part. My daughter Margaret Grubb shall have one tenth part. My daughter Susannah Yast shall have one tenth part. My daughter Elizabeth Keesecker shall have one tenth part. My daughter Hannah Kees shall have one tenth part. My daughter Sarah Hite shall have one tenth part. My daughter Rosanah Myers shall have one tenth part. My son Daniel Riner shall have one tenth part. My son Peter Riner shall have one tenth part. My son Jacob Riner shall have one tenth part. An lastly I constitute my son in law my lawful executor (who is Archabald Myers), with full power to carry out this my last will and testament. Witness my hand and seal this day and year above written. Jacob Riner (seal). In presence of John A. Miller, M. S. Grantham.”
    The will was produced in court August Term 1858 suggesting that Riner had died in the intervening period. The will was re-admitted to the record (Book 20, p. 108) by I. L. Bender, Clerk of the County Court in Berkeley Co., on 8 Sep 1904. The transcription was by Don C. Wood, 1976.


    9. Johan Abraham Snider

    was baptized 16 Apr 1769 as the son of Jacob and Margareth Schneider in the records of Trinity Lutheran Church in Lancaster PA. Christian Lutz and his wife Barbara served as sponsors [Trinity Lutheran Church Records, Vol. 2, p. 6].
    Abraham Snyder married Sarah Chidester about 10 Jun 1797 (date of bond) in Berkeley Co VA (Guy Keesecker, Marriage Records of Berkeley County West Virginia 1781-1854, from marriage bonds, Vol. 1, p. 21). Abraham Snider married Mary Miller about 18 Apr 1807 (date of bond) in Berkeley Co VA (Guy Keesecker, Marriage Records of Berkeley County West Virginia 1781-1854, from Bonds, Vol. 3, p. 56). Abraham Snider married Catherine Miller on 21 Jan 1819 in Berkeley Co VA (Guy Keesecker, Marriage Records of Berkeley County West Virginia 1781-1854, from marriage records, page 30).
    Abraham Snider purchased 514 acres of his father’s farm on both sides of Back Creek in 1810 [Berkeley Co Superior Court Deeds, Vol. 1, p. 62].
    Abraham Snider died on 7 Apr 1845 in Berkeley Co WV and had a will probated in 1845 [Berkeley Co VA Wills, Vol. 15, p. 32]. The will was complex due to the children being born of three wives. Robert K. Robinson, administrator, initiated a partition suit in chancery and the 738 acre plantation was divided into three parcels. Robert Penery purchased the Snider grist mill and 195 ½ acres for $642.21 on 6 Apr 1846 [Berkeley Co WV Deeds, Vol. 53, p. 301]. On 13 Apr 1846, George W. Snider, Abraham’s son, purchased the acreage that had been included in the widow Catherine Snider’s dowry [Berkeley Co VA Deeds, Vol. 50, p. 43].
    There is also a Virginia land grant in Berkeley Co filed by an Abraham Snyder. I am not versed enough in records of that county to know if there was just one man by this name. Abraham Snyder was granted 107 acres with a survey made 30 Aug 1827, warrant #2349, the land being on the west side of the North Mountain, bounded by Snyder’s own mountain tract and Hamm’s line. Governor John Floyd signed at Richmond VA 26 Oct 1830 [Northern Neck Grants D, No. 2, 1820-1829, p. 72-73, Reel 309). The survey is in Vol. C, p. 192 (Reel 319). The name also appears in grants for Pendleton County (1819) and Preston County (1834) but this writer cannot determine if either could be the same fellow.
    Census records for 1790 and 1800 Berkeley Co VA do not survive, but Abram Snider is listed in the 1800 census for Berkeley Co, p. 559, with 2 males under 10, 1 male 10-16, 1 male over 45, 2 females under 10, 1 female 10-16, and 1 female 16-26. Neighbors were Matthew Smock (?) and Thos. Bullerfield [sic]. Abm. Snyder is listed in the 1820 census for Middletown District, Berkeley Co VA, p. 91, with 2 males under 10, 1 male 16-18, 2 males 16-26, 1 male over 45, 1 female under 10, 1 female 10-16, 1 female 16-26, and 3 females 26-45. There were 2 in the household in agriculture and apparently 1 with a commercial enterprise. Neighbors were Wm. Butt Junr and James Ganoe. In 1830, Abraham Snyder appears in an alphabetical listing for Berkeley Co VA, p. 242, with 3 males under 5, 3 males 10-15, 1 male 15-20, 1 male 50-60, 1 female under 5, 1 female 10-15, and 1 female 30-40. The 1840 Berkeley Co VA census, p. 138, shows Abraham Snyder with 1 male 5-10, 2 males 10-15, 1 male 15-20, 1 male 20-30, 1 male 60-70, 1 female under 5, 1 female 5-10, 1 female 15-20, and 1 female 30-40. Neighbors were Henry Siler and “John Myers of G”. (This is an old Maryland tradition for separating people of the same name by identifying the father).
    There is a gravestone for Catherine (Miller) Snyder, wife of Abraham Snyder, in the Tomahawk Presbyterian Church Cemetery on Back Creek Valley Road, near Hedgesville WV. She died 21 Feb 1854, aged 55 years, 10 months, and 5 days. She was apparently much younger than her husband.
    Abraham Snider’s children were Maria, Jacob, James, and Charlotte, by the first wife, Sarah Chidester; Ann, Daniel, and Christian, by the second wife, Mary Miller; and Rose Ann, Abraham, William, George W., Hannah, John William, and Elizabeth Jane, by the third wife, Catherine Miller. Catharine Miller was born 9 Apr 1798 and died 21 Feb 1854 in Berkeley Co according to a Family Bible owned by Joseph C. Snyder, Martinsburg WV. The dates for the first two wives are not known.


    10. Johann Michael Snider

    , was born 18 Nov 1770 and baptized 13 Jun 1771 at the Trinity Lutheran Church, Lancaster PA, as the son of Jacob Snider and his wife Anna Margaretha. Sponsors were Michael Sohn and his daughter Salome [Trinity Lutheran Church Records, Vol. 2, p. 32]. Michael Snider must have died prior to the making of his father’s will in 1787. Note: Schneider Connections newsletter, Issue 55, p. 59, calls the mother Maria Margaretha in this baptism rather than Anna Margaretha in the published abstract.


    11. Daniel Snider

    was born 5 Aug 1772 in Berkeley Co WV and died 7 Mar 1866 in Thorn Twp., Perry Co OH according to a chart sent by descendant Pauline Arnold. Indeed, the book Perry Co., Ohio, Thorn Twp. Cemeteries, Volume 1, 1985, by Fisher and Ortman, p. 5, lists the Daniel Snider Family Cemetery, ½ miles east of County Road 28 (Ridenour Road) and ¾ mile north of State Route 256, on private property. “Stones gone.” This is supposed to be on the line of Sections 32 and 33 in Thorn Twp. The year of death anyway can be confirmed by an 1866 will for Daniel Snider, filed in Perry Co Will Book 3, p. 90-94.
    Daniel Snider first appears on the Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA tax list in 1799, so he was at least age 21 by this time. He had no land, but had 1 horse and 1 cow. It was an alphabetical listing.
    Daniel Snider paid .08 cents in the 1800 Providence Twp tax list, an alphabetical listing.
    Daniel Snider paid .39 cents in tax in Providence Twp in 1802 (alphabetical).
    Daniel Snider purchased several tracts of land. On 11 Nov 1805, Daniel Snider of Fairfield Co OH purchased the NW ¼ Sect. 33, Twp. 18, Range 17, now Thorn Twp., Perry Co OH, being 160 acres. On 11 Jun 1811, he purchased the SW 1/4 of Sect. 27, Twp. 17, Range 16, containing 166.24 acres, at a rate of $2.00 per acre (Chillicothe Land Office, Final Certificate #2083). This became Hopewell Twp when Perry Co was formed in 1818.
    Daniel Snider was married first to Mary Harshberger, daughter of John and Rebecca Harshberger, according to Mrs. Arnold. They had fourteen known children. A second marriage is filed in Perry Co OH (Vol. 1, p. 89), Daniel Snider to Elizabeth Parkinson, 4 Nov 1827, by Elijah Schofield, a minister of the German Baptist faith. Descendants say she was married a first time.
    Ohio’s 1810 census for Fairfield Co OH does not survive, but Daniel Snider does appear in 1820 Thorn Twp., Perry Co OH, p. 8A, with 4 males under 10, 1 male 10-16, 1 male 16-26, 2 males 26-45, 1 female under 10, 2 females 10-16, 2 females 16-26, 1 female 26-45, with 4 involved in agriculture. Neighbors were Mathias Greenawalt and William Friend. One Adam Snider was living nearby. In 1830 Thorn Twp., Daniel Snider is on p. 424, with 2 males under 5, 1 male 15-20, 2 males 20-30, 1 male 50-60, 1 female 5-10, 2 females 10-15, 1 female 20-30, and 1 female 30-40. Neighbors were John Dounhour and Abraham Clum with Mathias Greenawalt still nearby.By 1840, Daniel Snider is still in Thorn Twp., p. 62, with 1 male 5-10, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 60-70, 1 female under 10-15, 1 male 30-40, and 1 female 40-50. Neighbors were John Greenawalt and Joseph Snider. Daniel Snider Jr lived nearby. Daniel Snider, age 75 VA, a farmer with $3800 real estate, is listed in Thorn Twp., Perry Co OH, p. 408, in 1850, with Elizabeth Snider 57 MD, and David 21, Eli 18, and Sarah A., 10, all born OH. In 1860, Dan Snyder Sen. Is living still in Thorn Twp., p. 395. He is aged 87 VA, a farmer with $1600 real estate and $800 personal estate. Elizabeth is age 71, born MD. Eli Snyder 27 OH is still at home, along with a servant, Mary E. Whitter, age 19 OH. In the 1870 Thorn Twp., Perry Co OH census, p. 236, Elizabeth Snider, age 84 MD, is keeping house. She has $200 personal estate with no land. Jael Bashore, a female housekeeper, and David Snedeker, a huckster, are in the same household.
    Perry County has a fine series of quadrennial enumerations, a list of males over age 21, taken every four years in Ohio. Unfortunately, the early ones give just a name. In 1847, Daniel Snider was in Thorn Twp listed between Joseph G. Wiseman and Joseph Snider. The name George Parkinson appeared next. In 1851, the list reads: George Hitt, Daniel Snider, David Snider, Daniel Snider, and Peter L. Franks. In 1855, the list for Thorn Twp becomes alphabetical, and David Snider, Daniel Snider Sr., and Daniel Snider Jr., appear. By 1859, Daniel Snider Jr., Daniel Snider Sr., David Snider, Eli Snider, and Henry I. Snider are listed. In the 1863 Thorn Twp Quadrennial Enumeration, Daniel, John, Solomon, and Aaron Snider are all listed – but just one Daniel this time. The name Daniel Snider does not appear in 1867.
    The children of Daniel Snider, according to a chart supplied by descendant C. Woodrow Snider, were Rebecca, George N., Jacob, Mary, Susan, Catharine, John, Daniel Jr., Elizabeth, Samuel, Solomon, Joseph, Sarah, and Frances (by the first wife); and David and Eli (by the second wife).


    12. Margaret (Snider) Stuckey

    “consort of Simon Stuckey was born Sept. 1773, died Oct. 1835, age 62 years,” according to a note in a Bible in the possession of Jacob Gump of Mann’s Choice PA. Simon Stuckey was “born Jan. 15, 1767; died June 25, 1842, age 76 yrs., 5 mos., 10 da.” The dates for just three children are here listed, Joseph, Abraham, and John. The same information appears in the Samuel and Ann (Silver) Stuckey Bible owned by Opal Streiff (1978). It is evident that these dates were taken from five tombstones on the Solomon Reighard farm (five miles north of Bedford PA), rather than from a legitimate family record. There is, in fact, such a family record for an older Simon Stuckey and wife Barbara Fox, furnished by Samuel L. Stuckey of Lathrop MO to Bedford Co researcher Helen Shaffer Hill. This lists children “Simon and Susan, twins, born March, 1767”; and a little further down the list, “Simon, born January, 1772.” Unless the transcription is wrong, this would generally suggest that the first born of that name had died and a second son was named after the first.
    This Simon Stuckey Family Graveyard was transcribed and published in Burial Grounds of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, Vol. 9, p. 88-93, by James Boor. If one takes Upper Snake Spring Valley Road SR 1003 north about one mile from Bedford Co Memorial Hospital (Rt 30), the lane to the cemetery is between a barn and a brick house on the left. It is beyond the field and now in the woods. Five beautiful old stones are in a row. Pictures appear in the book but are too dark to reproduce well here.

  • In Memory, Simon Stuckey, Died June 25, 1842, Aged 75 y, 5 m & 20 ds
  • In Memory of Margaret, Consort of Simon Stuckey, Born Sept 1773, died Oct 1833, aged 60 years
  • In Memory, Abraham Stuckey, Born Feb 1817, Died May 1833, Age 16
  • In Memory of Joseph Stuckey, Born August 18, A.D. 1803, Died 1826, Aged 23
  • In Memory of John, son of Simon & Margret Stuckey, Born 1808, Died 1808

  • The older Simon Stuckey had purchased land in Berkeley Co VA, 15 Sep 1775, from Conrad Fox, in consideration of 100 pounds; recorded 20 Mar 1781 (Berkeley Co Deeds, Vol. 5, p. 599). This tract is mentioned in a 23 Nov 1795 deed (Berkeley Co Deeds, Vol. 12, p. 354), George Shaver, executor of the last will and testament of Simon Stuckey, dec’d., and Barbara, widow of said Simon Stuckey, and “now wife to the said George Shaver of the county of Washington, and State of Maryland,” sell to Jacob Stuckey of Berkeley Co VA, for 100 pounds, the said Simon Stuckey tract, he having received undivided halves from Conrad Fox and Balser Fox and his wife Elizabeth on 23 May 1780 [sic]. This older Simon Stuckey left a will in Washington Co MD, made 26 Dec 1785 and proved 4 Feb 1786. A son Simon is not among those named in the will, but he is among nine heirs who receive 216.6.11 “Specie” on 19 Mar 1786. It is interesting that the names in the estate distribution follow the order in the family record, further suggesting that the younger Simon Stuckey was born in Jan 1772, not 1767. Because the older Simon died at a young age, it is possible to sort out Berkeley Co documents between the two Simons.
    Regina Schneider married Simeon Strucker on 6 Aug 1793 in Berkeley Co VA (Guy Keesecker, Marriage Records of Berkeley County West Virginia 1781-1854, from German Church records, page 3). I don’t see these “German Church records” quoted in other Snider research material, and curiously, this marriage entry does not appear in two published genealogies, Stuckey-Huffman Cousins, by Opal L. Streiff, 1978, and Stuckey Family and Snyder Family, by Melvin B. Summers, ca. 1935. They do mention the nickname “Regina” or sometimes “Rose”.
    There are several land deeds for Simon Stuckey. Bedford Co Deeds, Vol. K, p. 53, Simon Stukey [sic] of Providence Twp., to John Ewalt of Napier Twp., a tract of land, recorded 6 Sep 1815. The Stuckey-Huffman Cousins genealogy includes the following paragraph: “Simon Stuckey III owned the Mansion Tract consisting of improvements and 173 acres and 15 acres. Another tract, in the use of George, in Providence Township, 238 acres. Wallach tract in Bedford Township, 320 acres use of William Stuckey. Tract in Napier Township Forks of the Road tenure of Charles and Daniel Stuckey one called Ewalt place 166 acres, Kinton Tract 50 acres, another adjoining 123 acres Samuel and Sophia.” I have not hunted down the actual deeds.
    Letters of administration were granted to David and Charles Stuckey on the estate of Simon Stuckey, late of Providence Twp., Bedford Co., on 27 Jun 1842. Bond was taken for $1000, with securities, Francis B. Barclay and James Taylor. The widow had filed a renunciation of administration [Bond #95]. The transfer of Simon Stuckey’s land is in Bedford Co PA Deeds, Vol. 5, p. 588. It is in the form of an agreement with Stuckey’s widow, Eve. The signers were: David Stuckey, Daniel Stuckey, Simon Stuckey, Charles Stuckey, Jacob Stuckey, William Stuckey, James Taylor and wife Mary, Joseph Smith and wife Margaret, David Snider and wife Elizabeth, Samuel Carney and wife Susan, and Michael Lutz and wife Rosanna.
    Author Opal L. Streiff refers to the settlement of Simon Stuckey’s estate, filed 12 May 1851, Charles Stuckey, Administrator. Receipts charged totaled $16,520.03 and credits $1,014.36 (opposite what you think). A petition for settlement was filed by David Stuckey, the eldest son. “Father died Intestate, left a wife and issue, left eight sons and six daughters: David, Daniel, Samuel S., Simon, Charles, Jacob, William, George, Mary, wife of James Taylor, Margaret, wife of Joseph Smith, Belleville, Illinois, Elizabeth, wife of Daniel Snider, Illinois, Susanna, wife of Samuel Carney, Rosanna, wife of Michael Lutz, and Sophia, wife of George Gump.”
    Stuckey had owned five shares of stock in the Bedford-Somerset Turnpike worth $811 per share. The dividends since 1843 had been received by son Samuel S. Stuckey. Sundry suits had been filed by Daniel Stuckey, William Stuckey, and Isaac Clark. The court ordered the appraisal of the Forks property and confirmed sale to George Stuckey on 10 May 1851, 123 acres. According to author Strieff, Simon Stuckey testified: “The notes given by my father to David were given for money borrowed from David, which belonged to his wife. The old man needed money at that time to pay for property he had purchased at the Forks. David asked the old man to pay him but he said he never would pay him.” Samuel S. Stuckey testified: “I think my father never kept a book – he could read but little. Notice had been given to all the heirs to meet at the Forks at the time agreement was made. There were three or more arbitrations in regard to suit. I consider I have lost by the settlement.” Eve Phillips Stuckey, a widow at the time she became the second wife of Simon Stuckey, also testified in this case. It sounds like the partition of the vast Stuckey property was not on the best of terms.
    The Forks of the Road Inn property mentioned in the estate settlement was purchased by Simon Stuckey in 1817 according to Mrs. Strieff. He purchased 1000 acres of land near this establishment. The inn, which stood until 1897, was operated by several Stuckey sons. George Stuckey had it in 1835 and it eventually went to heirs of Simon’s youngest daughter, Sophia (Stuckey) Gump.
    The 1790 Berkeley Co VA census doesn’t survive, if Simon Stuckey was even old enough to be listed in a household.
    Simon Stuckey is on the 1795 Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA tax list, with 2 horses, 2 cows, and a valuation of $364.
    Simon Stucky [sic] first appears in Pennsylvania on the 1796 Providence Twp tax list with no land or home, but 2 horses and 3 cows, valued at $112. Neighbors were Margret Snider, Widow, and Jacob Snider.
    Simon Stuckey paid .47 cents tax in 1797 Providence Twp. His neighbors were Margaret Snider, widow, and Jacob Snider.
    In 1798, Simon Stuckey paid $2.33 tax in Providence Twp and his neighbors were listed as Margret Snider, widow, and Jacob Snider.
    In the 1798 Providence Twp Direct Tax, he is listed with a shingled house 20 x 20 valued at $40, an old stable 20 x 18, and a shingle roofed barn 60 x 20. His land consisted of 148 acres valued at $592. The adjoining landowner was Jacob Bennett.
    Simon Stuckey is taxed in Providence Twp in 1799 with 130 acres, 2 horses, and 3 cows. It is an alphabetical listing.
    In 1800, he is in the Providence & Colerain Twp, Bedford Co PA census, p. 407, between Margaret Snyder and Peter Swartzmiller. Simon Stuckey is listed with 4 males under age 10, 1 male 26-45, 1 female under 10, and 1 female 26-45. Simon Stuckey paid $1.04 in the 1800 Providence Twp tax list, an alphabetical listing.
    Simon Stuckey paid $2.89 in tax in Providence Twp in 1802 (alphabetical).
    In 1804, Simon Stuckey is still paying taxes in Providence Twp, with 130 acres warrant land, valued at $260, plus 4 horses and 4 cows.
    Simon Stuckey appears on the 1805 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), tax paid $2.13.
    In 1806, Simon Stuckey is in the Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical) again paying $2.13.
    Simon Stuckey appears on the 1808 Providence Twp tax roll (alphabetical) with 240 acres warrant land, 1 horse, and 3 cows. He was a farmer with a valuation of $933.
    In 1810, Simon Stookey is in Providence Twp., Bedford Co, p. 555, with 3 males under 10, 4 males 10-16, 1 male 26-45, 3 females under 10, 1 female 10-16, and 1 female 26-45. Neighbors were Jno. Losinger and Jacob Ritchey.
    The 1811 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), shows Simon Stuckey with 240 acres of patented land, 5 horses, 6 cows, valued at $321.
    Simon Stuckey has two parcels of patent land in 1814, the next surviving Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), viz., 134 acres and 173 acres, with 6 horses and 4 cows, valued at $1127.
    By the 1817 tax list, Simon Stookey was living in Napier Twp., Bedford Co., with 725 (?) acres, 2 horses, 4 cows, an innkeeper, with property valued at $1215. He also had a 119 acre tract valued at $119.
    The acreage in 1817 may be a mistake, because in 1820 Napier Twp tax lists, Simon Stuckey is listed with two tracts, 166 acres and 123 acres, 4 horses, 4 cows, with a value of $1026 and $245 respectively. Simon Stuckey is also taxed in Providence Twp with 130 acres patent land, 100 acres warrant land, 3 horses, 4 cows, valued at $740.
    In 1820, Simon Stookey was living on his Napier Twp., Bedford Co property, p. 19, with 2 males under 10, 1 male 16-18, 1 male 16-26, 1 male over 45, 3 males under 10, 2 females 10-16, 1 female 16-26, and 1 female over 45. There were 3 agriculturalists in the family. Neighbors were John Sills and Solomon Waters.
    There is a Samuel Stuckey in Napier Twp 1823 tax list, but Simon Stuckey appears to be in Providence Twp with 118 acres patent land. There is just a dot under horses and cows so I cannot make out the number.
    By 1830, Simon Stuckey was living back in Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 117, with 1 male 5-10, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 15-20, 1 male 60-70, 1 female 10-15, 1 female 15-20, and 1 female 50-60. Neighbors were William Nyman and Henry Snider.
    Simon Stuky is listed in West Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 256, in the 1840 census, with 1 male 20-30, 1 male 70-80, and 1 female 40-50. Neighbors were Jacob Shatzer and Lucas Soup. I could not locate Eve Stuckey in 1850, if she was still living.


    13. Joseph Snider

    , may have been born about 1774-1775. In an August Term 1822 Bedford Co PA divorce petition [quoted hereafter], he states that he is “about forty-five years last past.” It actually reads in context as if he were a resident of Bedford Co that long, which is not the case. Therefore, I think he may be giving his age. This computes to 1776-1777 but he must be a little older to have married in early 1792.
    Joseph Schneider married Catherine Reiner on 16 Mar 1792 in Berkeley Co VA (Guy Keesecker, Marriage Records of Berkeley County West Virginia 1781-1854, from German Church records, page 1). He married second 15 Oct 1799 Catharine Eva; divorced 9 Apr 1823 [Bedford Co Supreme Court, Vol. 10, No. 23]. Researchers list another wife, Catherine Brecht, but this is unlikely.
    Joseph Snider died in Bedford Co PA prior to 27 Apr 1825 when Michael Richey was appointed guardian of William and Samuel Snider, two minor children of Joseph Snider, deceased.
    “The Petition of Henry Snider humbly showth, that his two half brothers William and Samuel Snider, under the age of fourteen, children of his father Joseph Snider late of Providence Township deceased, have no guardians to take care of their persons and estates. Your petitioner therefore prays the court to appoint some suitable person or persons to take care of their persons and estates. Henry Snider.” [Bedford Co Orphan’s Court, April Term 1825].
    Joseph Snider Jr was the same day appointed guardian of two other children, Mary and Elizabeth Snider, minor children above the age of fourteen, who chose their own guardian. Eleven children were named in the petition of Henry Snider, a son, at the Aug Term 1825, Bedford Co Orphan’s Court, saying that Joseph Snider of Providence Twp died intestate, and that the heirs wish to divide the land.
    “The petition of Henry Snider, son and one of the heirs of Joseph Snider late of Providence Township, dec., humbly showth that your petitioners said Father lately died intestate leaving issue eleven children to wit, your petitioner, Jacob, Joseph, Sarah the wife of David Sellers, Catharine wife of George Sellers, Daniel Snider, John, Mary, Elizabeth, William and Samuel Snider, the last four of whom to wit, Mary, Elizabeth, William and Samuel are still in their minority, and that the said intestate died seized in his demesne as of fee of and in a certain messuage and tract of land situate in Providence Twp., Bedford Co., containing about ninety-two acres and the usual allowance with the appurtenances adjoining land of John Harshberger Sr., and Jacob Shatsher [Bedford Co PA Orphan’s Court, 20 Aug 1825].
    There is a Supreme Court case in Bedford Co PA, Joseph Snider vs. Catherine Eva, for subpoena on libel for divorce, 17 Dec 1822, served by George Muller, Sheriff. “The petition of Joseph Snider of the Township of Providence in the said county, farmer, respectfully therewith, that your petitioner on or about the fifteenth day of October 1799 was lawfully joined in matrimony with Catharine Snider, his present wife, late Catharine Eva, and from that time until the first day of August 1820, lived and cohabited with her and in all respects demeaned himself as a faithful and affectionate husband towards the said Catharine, and although the laws of God and of this Commonwealth as well as their mutual vows plight to each other, they were toward to that chastity which ought to be inseparable from the marriage. That yet the said Catharine in vexation of her marriage vow hath for a considerable time past given herself up to adulterous practices and hath committed adultery with a certain Gabriel South of the township aforesaid, farmer. Your petitioner further states that he is a citizen of the State of Pennsylvania, and that he was raised therein, in the County of Bedford aforesaid about forty five years last past. Your petitioner therefore prays your honors to order a subpoena to insure in due form of law derided to the said Catharine, commanding her to appear at the next court of Common Pleas, to be held at Bedford, in and for the County of Bedford on the first Monday of August next, to answer this libel or petition, and to show cause, if any she hath, why your petitioner should not be divorced from the bonds of matrimony, and your petitioner will pray he.” Catharine had not appeared in court August Term 1822, and Joseph Snider won the indictment against Catherine Eva for committed adultery on 9 Apr 1823 [Email, Ernest Snider to Tom Neel, 6 Apr 2001].
    Mildred Snider Thompson, a Joseph Snider descendant, relates the story that Mrs. Snider “left the home and her children prior to the divorce and the young child followed its mother down the road and fell from the bridge at Tussey’s Run and drowned.” This was supposed to be a female child, born in late 1819. However, this researcher has the first wife of Joseph Snider as Catherine Brecht, who died ca. 1810-1811, and this second wife as Catharine, surname unknown [Letter, Mildred Thompson, Plymouth IN to Tom Neel, 5 Sep 1980].
    Joseph Snider and Philip Ritchey were bondsmen in the estate of Francis Ritchey, dec’d, by Samuel Ritchey, administrator, Apr 1805 [Bedford County Archives, by James B. Whisker, Vol. 1, p. 68].
    1796 is the first tax list on which Joseph Snider is listed in Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA. He has 91 acres, 12 of those improved, 1 house, 1 barn, 2 horses, and 3 cows, with a valuation of $319. Neighbors were Frederick Kaiz (or Fraiz). He should have been at least age 21 at this time.
    Joseph Snider paid $1.07 tax in 1797 Providence Twp. His neighbors were Jacob Snider and Frances Richey.
    In 1798, Joseph Snider of Providence Twp is taxed .72 cents. His neighbors were listed as Jacob Snider and Francis Richey.
    Joseph Snyder does appear on the 1798 Direct Tax for Providence Twp (p. 50), with land valued at $300. In the “B” list, he has a shingle roofed house 22 x 18, valued at $60, with a barn 56 x 18. His neighbor is David Snyder. Joseph is listed with 100 acres valued at $300.
    In 1799, Joseph Snider is in the alphabetical Providence Twp tax list with 100 acres, 2 horses, and 3 cows.
    Joseph Snyder appears in the 1800 Providence & Colerain Twp., Bedford Co PA census, p. 407, with 3 males under 10, 1 male 26-45, 1 female under 10, and 1 female over 45. Joseph Snider paid .83 cents in the 1800 Providence Twp tax list, an alphabetical listing.
    The 1804 Providence Twp tax list shows Joseph Snider with 90 acres patent land, valued at $360, and 2 horses, 4 cows.
    Joseph Snider appears on the 1805 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), tax paid $1.00.
    In 1806, Joseph Snider is in the Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical) again paying $1.00.
    Joseph Snider appears in the 1808 Providence Twp Tax list (alphabetical) with 91 acres patent land, 2 horses, 2 cows, with a valuation of $478; occupation, farmer.
    In the 1810 census for Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, Joseph Snider is on p. 556 with 2 males under 10, 1 male 10-16, 1 male 16-26, 1 male over 45, 1 female under 10, and 1 female 26-45. Neighbors were Jno. Harsberger [sic] and Peter Carnes.
    In the 1811 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), Joseph Snider has 90 acres patent land, 3 horses, 4 cows, valued at $209.
    Joseph Snider has 93 acres patent land in 1814, the next surviving Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), with 3 horses, and 3 cows, valued at $249.
    Joseph Snider is listed with 93 acres warrant land in the 1817 tax list for Providence Twp., 4 horses, 3 cows, and a valuation of $368.
    Joseph Snider is in the 1820 Providence Twp., Bedford Co census, p. 84, with 2 males under 10, 2 males 10-16, 1 male over 45, 2 females under 10, 2 female 16-26, 1 female 26-45, and 1 female over 45. There were 3 in the household in agriculture. Neighbors were Simon Shertzer and Peter Kerns.
    The 1820 Providence Twp tax list shows Joseph Snyder with 92 acres patent land, 2 horses, 3 cows, valued at $325.
    He is not on the 1823 Providence Twp tax list, nor do I spot his widow.


    14. George Washington Snider

    , according to descendant C. Woodrow Snider, was born 1776 in Berkeley Co VA (source not provided). His wife was named Barbara. Their children are outlined in a family record headed “George Snider his book give him cause there in to look,” but unfortunately, the dates for George were not included. Barbara was mentioned with a birth date of 11 Aug 1782.
    George Snider, wheelwright, first appears on the Providence Twp., Bedford Co Pa tax list in 1799 with no land, no horses, but 1 cow. It is an alphabetical list, but he is only two names away from the widow Margaret Snider. He would have to be age 21 and have something taxable to be taxed.
    George Snider paid .08 cents tax in 1800 Providence Twp., and alphabetical listing.
    George Snider removed to Belmont Co OH by 1806. Belmont Co Deeds, Vol. A, p. 473, Frances [sic] Bowen of Jefferson Co OH is entitled a patent for Range 4, Twp. 7, Sect. 31 (640 acres), but is paid $150 by George Snider of Belmont Co OH, 7 Apr 1806, and transfers the certificate to him. Witnesses, Sterling Johnston and William Craig. Belmont Co Deeds, Vol. B, p. 139, George Snider and wife Barbara of Belmont Co OH have received patent on the above land 1 Oct 1806, and for $320 are conveying 160 acres of this to Nathan Spencer of Belmont Co OH, 11 Jul 1807. Witnesses were Sterling Johnston and Robert Griffith. The same date (p. 140), George and Barbara Snider, for $1000, sell 227 acres, 2 rods, 33 perches of this tract (SE part) to James Caldwell of Belmont Co. The same two witnesses sign. Belmont Co Deeds, Vol. B, p. 126, George and Barbara Snider of Belmont Co sell 100 acres, 2 rods, 20 perches, of this same tract for $200 to John Wilkinson of Belmont Co. James Cloyd and Batteal Harrison were the witnesses. Meanwhile, George Snider acquired the SW ¼ Sect. 26 Twp. 7 Range 4 as an assignee of Yosht Luke, and then deeded 15 acres of this to James Hilton of Belmont Co on 20 Mar 1813 (Belmont Co Deeds, Vol. G, p. 507]. He is probably the George Snider who purchased federal land 26 Mar 1816 in Belmont Co., part of Range 9, Twp. 5, Sect. 17.
    He had land holdings in Monroe Co as well, there being a patent for the NW part of the SW ¼ and the SW part of the NW quarter of Sect 35, Twp 2-N, Range 5-W on 21 Aug 1837. He must have purchased more land there, for there is an indenture, 1 Jan 1839, for George Snider and Nancy, his wife, of Belmont Co., to George Snider, Jr., of Monroe Co., north half SW ¼, Sect. 3, Twp. 5, Range 5 [Monroe Co Deeds, v. 1, p. 134]. Although the name George Snider/Snyder is popular, and there is another man with the name in Monroe Co pre-1820 tax lists, our fellow could be the George Snyder who received a patent on Sect 33, Twp 2, Range 5 on 25 Dec 1839 in nearby Harrison Co OH. A thorough search of deeds records in this part of Ohio should be done.
    The first marriage for George Snider and his wife Barbara has not been located. According to the family record, the first child, Marye [sic], was born 23 Feb 1801, so one could estimate the approximate marriage year. C. Woodrow Snider does not point this out in his book, but in the family record, between the births of William Snider in 1815 and Joseph Snider in 1817, there is the following line: “Barbery Snider the 11 Day 1782 of Agust [sic].” One might suggest that this is her birth date making her 18 years of age when her first child was born. There is a second marriage (Belmont Co Marriages, Vol. 4, p. 113) for George (his X mark) Snider to Sarah Ewers (also called Miss Smith Ewers in the record) on 10 Sept 1835 by Asa Hoge, Justice of the Peace. Then there is apparently a third marriage, 17 Aug 1837 Belmont Co OH, to Mrs. Nancy Ewers. George’s son, George W. Snider Jr., died 3 May 1849 (Monroe Co tombstone) and this must be the one listed in the Belmont Co OH General Index to Estates, as having an administration, case 2461, dated 21 Sep 1849, with the appointment in Vol. M, p. 74. Administrators were S. Bentley and J. Eaton. Additional material in v. 3, p. 23; and v. D, p. 183. I did not spot an estate for the older George W. Snider. A review of published cemetery records in Belmont and Monroe Co yield nothing. Interestingly, there is a Belmont Co marriage on file (Vol. B, p. 21) of a George Sniders to Fanny Southers on 3 Jan 1809. This does not fit the facts above, so Belmont Co has an extra George floating around too.
    Census records, in fact, are interesting. In 1820, Richland Twp., Belmont Co OH, p. 207, we find George Snider with 4 males under age 10, 3 males 10-16, 1 male 45 and over; 2 females under 10, 1 male 16-26, 1 female 26-45, and 3 involved in agriculture. Neighbors were Matthias Bills and John Bigbee. In 1830 Richland Twp., p. 243, George Snider has 1 male under 5, 1 male 5-10, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 15-20, 2 males 20-30, 1 male 50-60, 2 males under 5, 1 female 5-10, 1 female 10-15, 1 female 20-30, and 1 female 30-40. Neighbors were Thomas M. Harrison and James Bolen. This clearly shows that Snider was still alive, despite about 30 entries in Ancestry.com stating that he died in 1820. Another George Snider was living in Kirkwood Twp., Belmont Co in 1820 and 1830, but our fellow owned land in Richland Twp. In 1840, we still have a living George Snider in Richland Twp., Belmont Co., p. 123. He has 1 male 10-15, 1 male 15-20, 1 male 60-70, 1 female 10-15, 2 females 15-20, and 1 female 40-50. Neighbors were William Beard and James Campbell. Another George Snider, but in the 20-30 age bracket, was living in Goshen Twp., Belmont Co., p. 147, in 1840. I mention that because his neighbors were William Davis, John Ewers Jr., and Thomas Ewers. In 1850, Nancy Snyder, age 65 PA, with $560 real estate, is living in Goshen Twp., Belmont Co., p. 430, with Cyrus Ewers, age 22, and others. This is Nancy (----) Ewers-Snyder, and she is gone by 1860. Back in Richland Twp., Belmont County in 1850, p. 123, are found Eli Snider, Lucinda (Snider) Gumman, and John Snider – all children of George Snider, who is probably deceased. In 1850, George Snider Jr’s widow, Ellen (Eleanor) Snider, age 30, with five children ranging from age 1 to 12, is living in Sunbury Twp., Monroe Co OH, p. 214, next to her husband’s brother Levi Snider. George Snyder, age 20-30, is in Sunbury Twp in 1840, p. 23, so that means that we have an extra George living next to the Ewers family in 1840 and two Ewers marriages 1835 and 1837 to George Snider, one of them identified as ours since our George had a wife Nancy in later deeds. Strange!
    “George Snider his book, give Him gause [sic] there in to look. February the 23 Day 1801 Marye Snider was born; September the 12 Day 1802 Margit Snider was born; Abrile [sic] the 18 Day 1805 John Snider was born; Octobr the 29 Day 1806 Samuel Snider was born; Octobr the 22 Day 1808 Daniel Snider was born; May the 5 Day 1810 Jacob Snider was born; November the 24 Day 1811 Saley [sic] Snider was born; October the 20 Day 1813 George Snider was born; March the 6 Day 1815 William Snider was born; Barbery Snider was 11 Day 1782 of Agust born; February Day 22, 1817 Joseph Snider was born; December [poor copy] Nancy Snider was born; February Day 19th [poor copy] Susannah Snider was born; September 1st, 1825 [?] Levi Snider was born; September the 5th, 1828 Elie Snider was born.”


    15. William Snider

    died in 1815 in Montgomery Co OH. He is said to have been married to Elizabeth Warner about 1803 in Bedford Co PA.
    An 1821 Montgomery Co OH Common Pleas Law Record case gives the identity of the wife. This is quoted from a published abstract by Rose Shilt and Audrey Gilbert (p. 86-87):
    Jacob Warner, Andrew Warner, David Warner and Samuel Fokerth vs Robert Ewing, Ruth, Elizabeth and Robert Carrick, John, Susannah, Henry, Jacob, Catharine, Daniel, Henry, Daniel Warner, Catharine and John Mast. Samuel Folkerth, Jacob, David and Andrew Warner of Montgomery Co OH during year 1811, Robert Ewing of Butler Co OH and William Carrick late of Fayette Co KY, dec’d., owned E ½ Sect. 9 Twp 5 Range 5 in Montgomery Co certified from Cincinnati and sold same to Henry Warner, now dec’d. William Carrick died 1816 Fayette Co KY without giving deed and left minor children, Ruth, Elizabeth, Robert Carrick, living with their mother, Henry Warner died Nov 1815 and left Jacob, David, Andrew and Susannah Warner now married to Samuel Folkerth. Henry Warner also left, John, Henry, David and Catharine Warner now married to John Mast, Elizabeth Warner married to William Snyder and Elizabeth, now dec’d., leaving Susannah, Henry, Jacob Snyder, Catharine Snider [sic], Daniel Snyder, all minors. Samuel Folkerth had bought of Henry Warner, 100 acres, part of ½ section and 60 acres to Jacob Warner. Settlement map included [Montgomery Co Law Record, p. 641, 647].
    William Snider first appears on the 1804 Providence Twp., Bedford Co tax list (alphabetical), with no land, 2 horses and 2 cows. He had to be age 21 by this time.
    William Snider appears on the 1805 Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical), tax paid .20 cents.
    In 1806, William Snider is in the Providence Twp tax list (alphabetical) again paying .20 cents.
    William Snider appears on the 1808 Providence Twp tax roll (alphabetical) with no land; however, he had 2 horses, was a farmer, with a tax valuation of $100.
    Wm. Snider is first listed in the 1810 census for Providence Twp., Bedford Co PA, p. 556, with 2 males under 10, 1 male 26-45, 2 females under 10, and 1 female 26-45. Neighbors were Henry Richey and Joseph Davis.
    In 1811, William Snider is again taxed in Providence Twp with no land, 3 horses, 1 cow, and a valuation of $66.
    William Snider is not found on the next surviving Providence Twp tax list, that of 1814, but he is on the 1814 resident proprietors list for Montgomery Co OH with land in Range 5, Twp. 5, Section 17, originally patented to Abraham Dieter. This is Randolph Twp.
    There is a Montgomery Co OH deed dated 1813, Samuel Deeter to William Snyder, for Sect. 17, Twp. 5, Range 5 E, signed Samuel Deeter. Witness, Solomon Burkit [Montgomery Co Deeds, Vol. C, p. 91-92].
    William Snider’s administration is in Probate Vol. C, p. 48. Administrators were Jacob Warner and Samuel Folkerth. Securities, Thomas Newman and David Hover (Case #227).
    The inventory and appraisal of the estate of William Snider was taken 16 Jan 1816 by appraisers, William Hart, David Miller, and Jacob Puterbaugh. No total was given [Montgomery Co OH Common Pleas, Probate Docket C-1, p. 112-114, Nov Term 1816).
    The public sale record occurred 26 Jan 1818 yet has a filing date of 18 Jan 1818? The first date was probably 1816. One of the many purchasers was John Overholser, his sister’s husband [Montgomery Co Common Pleas, Probate Docket, Book C-1, p. 167].
    There is an April 1819 guardianship for Susannah Snider, age 15 years, heir of William Snider, deceased, who chose Henry Brombaugh as her guardian; securities, John Baker and Jacob Warner [Montgomery Co Common Pleas, Probate Docket Book D-1, p. 71, case #367]. Henry Snider, age 13 years, Jacob Snider, age 11 years, Catharine Snider, age 9 years, and Daniel Snider, age 7 years, minor heirs of William Snider, had their guardian Samuel Folkerth appointed by the court. Securities were Henry Brombaugh and Jacob Warner (case #368, same page as above). In Ohio, a child could pick their guardian at age 14. On 21 Sep 1829, Daniel Snyder, age 17 years, an heir of William Snyder, deceased, chose John Mast as his new guardian. Security was Jacob Warner [Montgomery Co Common Pleas, Probate Docket Book D-1, p. 446, case #972).
    William Snider’s children included: Susanna, Henry, Jacob, Catherine, and Daniel.